Dubai airport temporarily halts flights due to ‘drone activity’s

By Sara Mazloumsaki and Jonny Hallam, CNN

Updated 0805 GMT (1605 HKT) February 15, 2019

Dubai's International Airport is seen in this file photo.

Dubai’s International Airport is seen in this file photo.

(CNN)Departing flights from Dubai International Airport, one of the world’s busiest travel hubs, were temporarily suspended on Friday due to “unauthorized drone activity” near a runway, according the Ali Zaigham, the airport’s press relations manager.The pause lasted about a 30 minutes, Zaigham said. He could not tell CNN where the drone originated from. Dubai’s International Airport is the third-busiest in the world measured by total volume of traffic, according to Airports Council International. It welcomed some 88 million passengers in 2017, trailing only Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport and Beijing Capital International Airport, which hosted 104 million and 96 million passengers respectively. Major airports have been on alert for drones near runways since hundreds of flights were canceled at Gatwick Airport — London’s second busiest airport — just days before Christmas following a reported drone sighting.

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Israeli airports fend off 3 million attempted attacks a day, cyber head says

A 24/7 security operation center at Ben Gurion international airport handles cybersecurity threats

Israeli firms and the Ministry of Economy are setting up a consortium to deal with aviation cyber-threats (Shoshanna Solomon/Times of Israel)

Israeli firms and the Ministry of Economy are setting up a consortium to deal with aviation cyber-threats (Shoshanna Solomon/Times of Israel)


Israel’s Airports Authority, in charge of the nation’s international and domestic airports and its land border crossings, has to block three million attempts to breach its systems a day, mostly by bots, the head of cyber and information security at the authority, Roee Laufer, said.

In an interview with The Times of Israel and other reporters at the sidelines of a cybersecurity conference in Tel Aviv last month, Laufer said these “external threats” try to breach the “virtual fence” of cybersecurity protections the airports authority has built to protect the workings of the airports and border crossings it operates.

“We have our challenge cut out for us,” was all he said when asked how successful the authority has been in thwarting the attacks.

The Airports Authority set up a cybersecurity division four years ago, and, after that, a security operation center (SOC) at the country’s main airport, Ben Gurion international airport, which handles cybersecurity threats 24/7/365, he said.

Roee Laufer, head of cyber and information security at the Israel Airports Authority; speaking to reporters on Jan. 29, 2019 at CyberTech in Tel Aviv (Shoshanna Solomon/Times of Israel)

The center “detects and responds to potential cyber events,” he said.

The SOC makes Ben Gurion Airport possibly one of the only major international airports in the world that has such a center on its premises, he added. The authority is in charge of the airports and the border crossings, he emphasized, but not of securing the airlines themselves, which remains their own responsibility.

Surge in global travel brings increased digitalization at airports

The Airports Council International, an umbrella organization of airport authorities, predicts that by 2040 there will be 20.9 billion global passengers, up from 8.2 billion in 2017.

Airports thus must digitalize their processes to be able to handle this huge amount of traffic, said Laufer, from the check-in process to how airports interact with aircraft and how they vet passengers as they board.

“IT is at the core of the airport business,” he said. But this, in turn, increases the “attack surface” for cyber incidents at airports.

As the world undergoes digitalization and more institutions and objects become connected to the internet, the risks of a cyberattack surge. The global cybersecurity market is expected to grow from $153 billion in 2018 to $248 billion by 2023, data research firm MarketsandMarkets says in a report. Israel punches above its weight in the cybersecurity field, with the nation receiving 20% of the global share of private cybersecurity investments, second only to the US.

The airline industry is one of the most vulnerable and unprotected markets today, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu warned at a cybersecurity conference in Tel Aviv in January.

“Our airlines can be attacked one hundred ways,” he said. “They can be attacked by ground control interference, they can be attacked by the systems within the plane and the communications. It is in many ways right now the most vulnerable system that we have, but as you know everything today is vulnerable and everything is under attack. Civil aviation is the one area that requires the most immediate cyber defense solution but it is one of hundreds.”

In September, Bristol airport staff in the UK had to go back to working with whiteboards after all of its flight information screens were blacked out over a weekend in a ransomware attack. Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, one of the busiest in the world, shut off its internal Wi-Fi network as a security measure in March last year, as the city of Atlanta’s government network underwent a ransomware attack.

Illustrative image of travelers seen at the arrival hall of Ben Gurion International Airport, near Tel Aviv, on April 11, 2018. (Moshe Shai/FLASH90)

However, introducing new processes and technologies to an industry that has very rigid practices already in place is very hard, explained Israel Airports Authority’s Laufer. “One thing that makes airport and civil aviation safe is strict enforcement of safety and security,” he said. But that also makes it more difficult to innovate, he said.

The airline sector is also unique because there are a variety of parties involved in the business — airports, airlines and aviation industry suppliers — all of whom need to work very closely with one another to make the industry tick. “It is a very interconnected sector,” Laufer said.

To raise the level of cybersecurity in civil aviation as a sector, the effort needs to be sector-wide, he said.

“The chain is only as strong as its weakest link,” Laufer said. Thus, while some parts of the industry may have high levels of cybersecurity measures, if others don’t raise their standards as well, the sector  as a whole is vulnerable.

“It has to be a sectorial effort, and currently I’m afraid it’s not,” he said. The matter must be dealt with at a national, government level using the expertise of the civil aviation agencies, he urged.

In November, a group of Israeli cybersecurity firms, along with the Economy and Industry Ministry, set up a new cyber consortium to offer comprehensive, end-to-end cybersecurity solutions for the commercial aviation industry — airports, airlines and aircraft.

The consortium includes Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI), CyberArk, Check Point Software Technologies Ltd., El Al’s Cockpit Innovation hub, Karamba Security and ClearSky — a combination of veteran cybersecurity and aerospace firms that already offer “a broad range of aviation, security, intelligence and cyber solutions for the global market” alongside “young startups with cutting edge cyber products and technologies,” the consortium said in a statement at the time.

source : https://www.timesofisrael.com/israeli-airports-fend-off-3-million-attempted-attacks-a-day-cyber-head-says/

Passengers at CPH to assist in development of new security protocol

Passengers at Copenhagen Airport will be trialling new security features to ensure the longevity of the new technology, which will enable passengers to leave liquids in hand luggage.

security

Credit: Copenhagen Airport

Copenhagen Airport (CPH) has announced the beginning of the development planned for the current security protocols at the airport. These developments will improve the passenger experience by eventually ensuring that passengers can go through security without having to remove computers and liquids from their hand luggage. Until then, travellers and employees will test the new security equipment to help find the best solution for a new and future-proof security system.

The new security system will be developed over the next couple of years using two dedicated lanes (23 and 24), where the airport initially will test two new lane designs. These lanes will in the first instance be longer and have more packing stations to increase the number of passengers that can prepare for the screening process. New technology along with new equipment for baggage screening will also be introduced on the two lanes in the spring. The new equipment consists of C3 scanners, which can display advanced 3D images and allow passengers to leave electronics and liquids in the hand luggage during the screening process.

Johnnie Müller, Head of Security at Copenhagen Airport, said: “An increase in passengers and demands on security obviously places a high demand on airport security. We are constantly working to optimise the security process and improve the customer experience throughout the airport. It is therefore crucial that the new lanes and equipment are tested in operation, so that our employees and travellers can experience them in real situations. In this way, we can develop the best possible solution for the future.”

To further optimise security, Copenhagen Airport will test a number of different screening equipment, including C3 scanners from various suppliers. In addition, the airport will test new body scanners. As a result of this, security will be tailor-made for the requirements of Copenhagen Airport, its airport employees and passengers. 

Müller continued: “We want new security protocol to be modern, efficient and high-tech, but first and foremost, good security means we need to find the solution that best suits our airport. Not only does the solution have to suit our area, but it also has to assist our employees in providing the best service possible, as well as also being the best solution for the many different needs of our passengers. Unlike other airports, we will also test the new equipment and the new lanes in close cooperation with both employees and passengers, instead of creating a closed test environment that has difficulty in reflecting reality.”

New equipment and more efficient processes will improve the security control for passengers and employees. The new equipment and lane design will improve the ways that employees can assist passengers, which in turn will improve the airport passenger experience, something that usually begins at security.

Müller concluded: “Even though this new security system is a change for the better, we know that any change can be difficult. That’s why we are doing everything we can to advise the passengers using lanes 23 and 24 of the changes and how best to participate. Our employees have been thoroughly trained and signs have been placed throughout the area to ease the process.” 

source : https://www.internationalairportreview.com/news/81011/passengers-security-control-future/?utm_source=Email+marketing&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=IAR+-+Newsletter+%2307+-+eezeetags+-+14+Feb+2019&utm_term=Passengers+at+CPH+to+assist+in+development+of+new+security+protocol+*+plus+all+the+latest+airport+news…&utm_content=http%3a%2f%2femails.internationalairportreview.com%2frussellpublishinglz%2f&gator_td=3WLS%2f9RWpt2VJ3xzRtUhwy6xJnUbqmmWl%2fjLTy3bwVwPhSOkoqC1nkjBeyH6qtyRNa1HGpRHEWmcK3dA9ADq2SomuWsSu64R4KJofcmOLh0BXKGf0UUZPEMmLzaHSe%2fHDKmS7sBYgMgFVfdt3QqyXV6s24wvNOmlhxQfxsGZ64xeogJuGR1P9GnjiE0mI3t3GDzx7cPfH4L1qoVYZTx6yQ%3d%3d

Israeli airports fend off 3 million attempted attacks a day, cyber head says

A 24/7 security operation center at Ben Gurion international airport handles cybersecurity threats

Israeli firms and the Ministry of Economy are setting up a consortium to deal with aviation cyber-threats (Shoshanna Solomon/Times of Israel)

Israeli firms and the Ministry of Economy are setting up a consortium to deal with aviation cyber-threats (Shoshanna Solomon/Times of Israel)

Israel’s Airports Authority, in charge of the nation’s international and domestic airports and its land border crossings, has to block three million attempts to breach its systems a day, mostly by bots, the head of cyber and information security at the authority, Roee Laufer, said.

In an interview with The Times of Israel and other reporters at the sidelines of a cybersecurity conference in Tel Aviv last month, Laufer said these “external threats” try to breach the “virtual fence” of cybersecurity protections the airports authority has built to protect the workings of the airports and border crossings it operates.

“We have our challenge cut out for us,” was all he said when asked how successful the authority has been in thwarting the attacks.

The Airports Authority set up a cybersecurity division four years ago, and, after that, a security operation center (SOC) at the country’s main airport, Ben Gurion international airport, which handles cybersecurity threats 24/7/365, he said.

Roee Laufer, head of cyber and information security at the Israel Airports Authority; speaking to reporters on Jan. 29, 2019 at CyberTech in Tel Aviv (Shoshanna Solomon/Times of Israel)

The center “detects and responds to potential cyber events,” he said.

The SOC makes Ben Gurion Airport possibly one of the only major international airports in the world that has such a center on its premises, he added. The authority is in charge of the airports and the border crossings, he emphasized, but not of securing the airlines themselves, which remains their own responsibility.

Surge in global travel brings increased digitalization at airports

The Airports Council International, an umbrella organization of airport authorities, predicts that by 2040 there will be 20.9 billion global passengers, up from 8.2 billion in 2017.

Airports thus must digitalize their processes to be able to handle this huge amount of traffic, said Laufer, from the check-in process to how airports interact with aircraft and how they vet passengers as they board.

“IT is at the core of the airport business,” he said. But this, in turn, increases the “attack surface” for cyber incidents at airports.

As the world undergoes digitalization and more institutions and objects become connected to the internet, the risks of a cyberattack surge. The global cybersecurity market is expected to grow from $153 billion in 2018 to $248 billion by 2023, data research firm MarketsandMarkets says in a report. Israel punches above its weight in the cybersecurity field, with the nation receiving 20% of the global share of private cybersecurity investments, second only to the US.

The airline industry is one of the most vulnerable and unprotected markets today, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu warned at a cybersecurity conference in Tel Aviv in January.

“Our airlines can be attacked one hundred ways,” he said. “They can be attacked by ground control interference, they can be attacked by the systems within the plane and the communications. It is in many ways right now the most vulnerable system that we have, but as you know everything today is vulnerable and everything is under attack. Civil aviation is the one area that requires the most immediate cyber defense solution but it is one of hundreds.”

In September, Bristol airport staff in the UK had to go back to working with whiteboards after all of its flight information screens were blacked out over a weekend in a ransomware attack. Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, one of the busiest in the world, shut off its internal Wi-Fi network as a security measure in March last year, as the city of Atlanta’s government network underwent a ransomware attack.

Illustrative image of travelers seen at the arrival hall of Ben Gurion International Airport, near Tel Aviv, on April 11, 2018. (Moshe Shai/FLASH90)

However, introducing new processes and technologies to an industry that has very rigid practices already in place is very hard, explained Israel Airports Authority’s Laufer. “One thing that makes airport and civil aviation safe is strict enforcement of safety and security,” he said. But that also makes it more difficult to innovate, he said.

The airline sector is also unique because there are a variety of parties involved in the business — airports, airlines and aviation industry suppliers — all of whom need to work very closely with one another to make the industry tick. “It is a very interconnected sector,” Laufer said.

To raise the level of cybersecurity in civil aviation as a sector, the effort needs to be sector-wide, he said.

“The chain is only as strong as its weakest link,” Laufer said. Thus, while some parts of the industry may have high levels of cybersecurity measures, if others don’t raise their standards as well, the sector  as a whole is vulnerable.

“It has to be a sectorial effort, and currently I’m afraid it’s not,” he said. The matter must be dealt with at a national, government level using the expertise of the civil aviation agencies, he urged.

In November, a group of Israeli cybersecurity firms, along with the Economy and Industry Ministry, set up a new cyber consortium to offer comprehensive, end-to-end cybersecurity solutions for the commercial aviation industry — airports, airlines and aircraft.

The consortium includes Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI), CyberArk, Check Point Software Technologies Ltd., El Al’s Cockpit Innovation hub, Karamba Security and ClearSky — a combination of veteran cybersecurity and aerospace firms that already offer “a broad range of aviation, security, intelligence and cyber solutions for the global market” alongside “young startups with cutting edge cyber products and technologies,” the consortium said in a statement at the time.

source : https://www.timesofisrael.com/israeli-airports-fend-off-3-million-attempted-attacks-a-day-cyber-head-says/

Greater Toronto Airports Authority Keeping traveller’s safety and comfort at forefront

Heightened security, rising customer demands, comfort and safety of travellers are critical concerns for GTAA. Making sure public safety services like CCTV, Pass Control are always on. If lightening warning system doesn’t work, the flight can’t even land. If baggage service fails, the customer experience is impacted. Downtime of digital kiosk impacts revenue stream of airport authority. Watch the video to know how Symphony Summit helped GTAA to drive digital transformation through consumerized IT and user experience.

Securing our airports

A the end of 2018 Gatwick airport and the UK authorities were forced to bring in military teams, using advanced techniques developed on the battlefield, to search for an unauthorised drone buzzing the airport’s runway.

Although no drone or pilot was found, the impact on the airport was serious and Gatwick was closed for an unprecedented 33-hours.

The economic impact only came to light in January when the budget airline easyjet said that 80,000 passengers had been caught up in the ‘mayhem’ and that it had to cancel over 400 flights, at a cost to the airline of over £15million.

In total 1,000 flights were disrupted with over 140,000 passengers inconvenienced, suggesting the total cost to the airport and industry was anywhere between £50-100million.

The Chief Executive of easyjet, Johan Lundgren, described the closure as a “wake-up call to airport operators around the world.”

According to Geoff Moore, business development manager at Blighter Surveillance Systems, “The events at Gatwick really didn’t come as a surprise. The industry has been talking about this kind of event for some time.

“Airports are a commercial operation and most of the regulations concerning them are not mandatory, there is nothing currently in place to defend airports against drones.”

Richard Gill, CEO of Drone Defence added, “All airports face various demands on limited resources when it comes to mitigating risk. Up until easyjet’s impact assessment, which worked out at around £1.5million per hour, the industry didn’t have a benchmark figure to work with. Now with actual figures they can start to create a realistic budget to counter this threat and invest accordingly.”

Moore said, “Managing an airport is about managing risk and now we can put a cost on disruption caused by drones.”

As drones become more popular more are now being fitted out with high quality photo/video sensors and can operate with considerable power reserves, giving them a much wider field of action.

“While the number of commercial flights in the air at any one time totals around 15,000, there are millions of drones in operation,” said Moore, “and as more piloted and semi-autonomous drones enter our air space so there will be more accidents or near misses.”

British and US authorities have recorded a growing number of collision alerts but, while the risk of collision may be growing, of greater concern is the payload capabilities of certain drones which could be used for terrorist activities.

As a result, securing airports against unauthorised intrusions by drones is now being taken more seriously.

“To counter the threat of drones you need to look at a range of counter drone technologies. You need to invest in a significant amount of equipment – radio frequency spectrum analysers, direction finding antennas, radar and video, all have a part to play. Different detection systems have different capabilities,” Moore explained. “To effectively counter drones you need to deploy a combination of these technologies to be effective and that will be expensive.”

Much of the focus with anti-drone technology tends to be on specialist radar and thermal imaging techniques – the aim being to detect, track and then identify the drone and its operator.

As Moore explained, “You can use a simple acoustic device, a microphone, to track a drone which will have its own unique acoustic profile. But then you have to manage background noise problems.

“Video is another solution, but the sky is a big place and it’s not easy to track a small device with an optical camera. It’s best to deploy thermal management techniques but thermal cameras are not only very expensive but provide only limited resolution – video tends not to be an appropriate solution when combating drones.

“You can use radio frequency monitoring, but that only works if the drone is being piloted,” Moore continued.

With drones that are operated by radio waves it is possible to use a direction-finder to locate and challenge the drone’s pilot and then use jamming in all its forms (directional, omnidirectional, variable frequency ranges, etc.) to interrupt the flow of data between the drone and its ground station as well as the GPS-guiding system. Jamming the video can also stop the drone from transmitting its images, so making the intrusion pointless.

Jamming implementations

Drone Defence has developed a range of solutions to combat drones that target radio communications.

“We focus on the link between the drone and its pilot,” said Gill. “We have developed a RF detection system and can offer real-time awareness and, where required, we can enhance the system with other sensing technologies like radar, cameras and acoustics.”

The company has developed SkyFence, an electronic countermeasures system which prevents drones from flying into or close to a protected location by disrupting its command and navigation radio transmissions.

“We can use multiple low-powered radio transmitters which are strategically placed around a protected site – for example, on the perimeter fence of an airport. These devices would be placed every 40 feet along a fence and when activated would transmit a signal which is designed to overwhelm the drone’s radio transmissions. This breaks the control and video link between the drone and its operator,” explained Gill.

Jamming signals can be transmitted on GPS to force the remote pilot to navigate the drone themselves, provide the aircraft with an incorrect GPS solution (forcing it off course), disrupt communications which removes control from the remote pilot and possibly force the drone into a controlled landing.

The limiting factor on these types of counter-drone systems is that many countries have laws in place that restrict the use of jamming capabilities and jamming may only be undertaken with express permission from specific agencies.

Drone deterrence and detection is being affected by the growth in autonomous drones that, “Don’t’ transmit much because they can be pre-programmed. As a result, there’s little traffic between the pilot and the drone,” explained Moore.

Detection, at present, is primarily achieved by using radar, said Moore.

The B400 from Blighter

“The B400 from Blighter was designed to provide long range ground surveillance and can detect moving vehicles and people over a wide area.

“It uses Blighter’s passive electronically scanned array (PESA) radar technology which uses digital beam forming on both transmit and receive to help reduce unwanted detections from clutter, so reducing the number of false alarms which is crucial when you’re dealing with what is a very cluttered environment like an airport,” Moore said.

The company’s Anti UAV Defence System (AUDS) was developed to detect drones up to 10km away using electronic scanning radar and uses precision infrared and daylight cameras and specialist video tracking software to track the device before disrupting the flight using an inhibitor to block the radio signals that control it.

“This detect, track, disrupt, defeat process is very quick and typically takes less than 15s,” explained Moore.

The ideal solution, however, would be to use all relevant systems in a given area and merge the data to isolate the identified non-problematic drones from more dangerous intruders

The ease of obtaining drones or unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) has bred a vast associated industry, and many industries are using drones owing to their ease of use, availability, cost savings and their ability to perform dangerous tasks.

As a result, drones are becoming an increasing threat to aviation and in the United Kingdom, in the second half of 2017, there were 35 drone-related incidents reported to the authorities. These occurred up to an altitude of 12,000ft but some consumer level drones have a service ceiling of as high as 20,000ft.

Blighter’s Anti UAV defence system

So, what are the consequences of an aircraft impacting a drone in flight?

Research conducted by BALPA, in conjunction with the Military Aviation Authority and the UK’s Department for Transport, found by using computer simulations that an impact with the windscreen of an aircraft could result in catastrophic damage.

“The smaller hobby drones are not a risk, they are made primarily of plastic. It’s when you move to the larger commercial drones,” suggested Moore, “those with large titanium cameras could cause a lot of damage.”

According to the British Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) all major engine manufactures claim that their engines have been designed to contain engine fragments so that penetration by engine debris of the fuselage, fuel tanks and other critical areas is extremely limited.

Tests undertaken at the Virginia Tech University in the US found that a 3.5kg drone would severely damage the fan blades of a three-metre diameter turbofan engine in 1/200th of a second with drone debris within the engine reaching speeds of 1150kmh.

Whatever the impact drones must be seen as posing a real danger to commercial aircraft.

So, what role can drone manufacturers play in securing drones? China’s DJI Innovations, which is the largest drone manufacturer in the world, has included geo-fencing within the app that controls their drones, and this prevents them being operated in areas where aviation safety or national security may be affected.

A website has also been produced by DJI that shows no-fly areas as well as additional safety information that drone pilots can check and the company has also introduced a nine-question knowledge-based quiz on local regulations.

“The spectrum of adversaries is broad. From the inadvertent actor, who simply doesn’t know the rules and has no malicious intent, and that’s most drone operators, to those with malicious intent, and its those that we not only have to be able to locate and identify but bring down where possible,” said Gill.

Currently, counter-drone systems are under development with over 155 companies involved worldwide.

“There are a lot of companies coming into the drone detection space,” said Gill, “but many only have a limited risk management background.”

Drone regulation

Commenting on the Gatwick incident Russell Haworth, CEO of Nominet said: “Events at Gatwick have highlighted the urgent need for greater regulation of drones. A UK wide drone registry could go far beyond a mere list of registrations – a database could be created to authorise flights in real time, meaning all flights would need explicit permission before they can take off.

He continued, “The upcoming government’s Drone bill will hopefully start to tackle this, as well as exploring other options such as geo-fenced ‘no-fly’ zones that can communicate with a drone’s in-built GPS. But progress may need to accelerate to prevent highly disruptive events being repeated.”

While Haworth appears to be in favour of greater regulation Gill is concerned that this focus on regulation overlooks the benefits of the technology. A too heavy-handed approach to regulation could seriously impact the industry.

“We shouldn’t demonise drone technology, but rather focus on those will malicious intent,” Gill warned.

“At present it is possible to access open source drone projects, download designs, buy components from ebay, source code for a drone and, if I want to, I can delete restrictions and spoof the identity of a drone. All of which means that there’s obviously a lot the industry will need to do to operate securely in this space.

“However, I think in time the industry will become self-regulating. We’ll ultimately see the development of standard Unmanned Traffic Management (UTM) systems. These will provide flight planning, conflict avoidance and manage how drones enter and leave specific air corridors,” said Gill.

UTM systems are being developed for low-altitude airspace allowing for safer and more efficient low-altitude operations without requiring human operators.

“Both manufacturers and operators will be happy to develop products that automatically integrate into a national UTM system – hobby drones will be registered and able to talk automatically to those UTM systems.”

When it comes to combating drones i.e actually shooting them down, the law remains opaque.

“Current regulations are likely to be relaxed. At present a decision to bring down a drone needs to be authorised by the Home Office, in the UK,” explained Moore.

“I think those regulations are likely to be relaxed and police involvement is likely to be increased, but that will require new legislation and a better understanding of how to use anti-drone technology,” added Gill.

“Airports need guidance from their regulators as to how to counter the growing threat of drones.

“When is it legitimate to apply jamming technology? What will be the rules of engagement and how will you mitigate any threat?”

Author
Neil Tyler

source : http://www.newelectronics.co.uk/electronics-technology/securing-our-airports/208962/

Delivery Service AtYourGate Launches at New York City Airports

AtYourGate

Image via AtYourGate
New York City’s airports are the first on the East Coast to team up with AtYourGate to give time-poor travelers a richer shopping and dining experience.




AtYourGate has delivered more than 5,000 orders and generated more than 15,000 app downloads since it launched its dining and shopping delivery service on January 14 at Newark Liberty International (Terminals A and B), LaGuardia (Terminal B) and John F. Kennedy International (Terminal 7) airports. Upon placing an order from participating shops and restaurants using the app, customers can check real-time status updates. Deliveries are received within 30 minutes of order placement, with no minimum order requirement.
AtYourGate seeks to step up when passengers have to buy items like headphones, neck pillows, last-minute gifts or snacks from airport shops and restaurants as they hurry toward the departure gate or baggage claim. Passengers get more dining and shopping options by not having to run all over the airport, and airlines can reap the benefits of passengers arriving to the gate on time. “Our primary observation is that passengers traveling through the Port Authority NY NJ airports are more stressed for time, and as a result have adopted our AtYourGate service at a faster pace,” AtYourGate president David Henninger told APEX Media.
The company’s East Coast debut involved partnerships with on-demand delivery platform GOLO and online payment company Paysafe Group. The JFK launch involved a hand from British Airways, which operates Terminal 7. “AtYourGate’s rapid expansion is a testament to its strong partnerships, which have enabled us to offer the best-in-industry app for mobile ordering and delivery in our current network of airports,” said PJ Mastracchio, founder and CEO of AtYourGate, in a press release.
RELATED: PHOTOS: Air Canada Opens Maple Leaf Lounge in LaGuardia’s New Terminal
Newark Liberty customers have access to Famous Famiglia Pizzeria, Jersey Mike’s, Manchu Wok, Sora Sushi Bar, Qdoba Mexican Eats, Dunkin’ Donuts, Auntie Anne’s and Wendy’s. Customers at LaGuardia can order from Irving Farm Coffee Roasters, Kingside Bar, 5 Boroughs Food Emporium, Osteria Fusco and La Chula Taqueria. JFK users can snag snacks from Burger Joint, Irving Farms Coffee Roasters, and Apartment 7B Deli.
This partnership is part of the Port Authority’s effort to improve customer service at all three major airports serving New York City. “We are continually exploring service innovations and new technologies in order to make traveling easier for our customers,” said Port Authority executive director Rick Cotton in a press release. “Partnering with innovative companies such as AtYourGate helps us effectively meet passenger needs in an increasingly digital world.”  The Port Authority’s other initiatives include unlimited free high-speed Wi-Fi; mobile-friendly websites for easier access to wait times and other real-time information and updated restroom facilities.
AtYourGate first launched at San Diego International Airport in early 2018. The Port Authority plans to make AtYourGate or similar services available at all terminals in all three NYC airports by the end of 2019.


Jordan Yerman
Jordan juggles deadlines across various time zones as he writes about travel, culture, entertainment, and technology.

source : https://apex.aero/2019/02/08/delivery-service-atyourgate-new-york-airports