China Continues Facial Recognition Adoption With Airport Scanners

By PYMNTS Posted on December 11, 2019

Beijing Daxing International Airport has been incorporating facial recognition software more and more, and it’s being used to do everything from identifying passengers to purchasing items from the duty free store, according to a report by Bloomberg.

China has been upping the ante on places that use the technology, including train stations, customs and of course, the airport. The technology matches a person’s face with their passport, and is meant to speed up the process of traveling through the airport.

Wang Qiang, who is the deputy general manager of planning and design for the starfish-shaped building, said the facility will process over 100 million passengers per year by 2040. The airport is a key piece of Chinese President Xi Jinping’s move into aviation with the goal for China to be the top air travel market in the next decade.

China is farther ahead on the technology than many other countries in the world, and it’s used in fast food restaurants and subway systems in the country. There has been some pushback, however. China Central Television, which is owned by the state, has asked for laws to regulate the technology, and a professor sued a zoo over it as well.

Wang said the technology will help the sometimes tedious affair of moving through airport security, and purchases in shops can be made “with your face.”

Recently, passengers at the airport had a choice of whether to register using their face or documents.

In other China facial recognition news, technology firms in the country are framing facial recognition policies at the United Nations (UN).

Data shows that Chinese tech firms are striving to expand markets for the latest facial recognition technology while advancing a global standard.

Telecommunications equipment maker ZTE, security camera firm Dahua Technology, and the state-owned Chinese telecommunication company China Telecom are among the companies proposing international specifications for universally consistent technology in the UN’s International Telecommunication Union (ITU).

source :https://www.pymnts.com/news/biometrics/2019/china-continues-facial-recognition-adoption-with-airport-scanners/

Airports of the future: SITA’s 10 predictions for the next decade

By Benoit Verbaere, business development director, SITA on December 12, 2019 Airport, Features

Air transport IT provider SITA has unveiled 10 bold predictions about the technology shaping how passengers will move through the airport of the future. Benoit Verbaere, business development director, SITA, predicts major change in almost every aspect of the airport experience.

The airport experience has morphed dramatically in the past 10 years with the introduction of biometric security, mobile check-in, and baggage tracking. And there is much more to come. The next decade will witness an exponentially accelerated pace of change as digital native passengers and staff usher in transformative technologies, from flying taxis to airports that think for themselves.

Passenger numbers are set to double in the next 20 years, according to IATA, but airport expansion won’t keep up. And passengers, quite rightly, want a smooth and easy journey through the airport. The only way we can make sure airports continue to work smoothly is by developing and implementing new technologies that make them more efficient while also enhancing the passenger experience.

Security will be integrated into a frictionless journey
Over the next decade, going through security will mean walking along a corridor. No more taking off your coat, shoes, and belt, or putting little bottles into little bags. And no more queues. Passengers and their bags will be recognized automatically as they go through automated checkpoints. Hard checkpoints will be replaced by sensor corridors, making physical document checks obsolete.

Passengers will be in control of their digital identity
The adoption of digital self-sovereign identity and persistent travel tokens will put passengers back in control of what aspects of their identity should be revealed, for what purpose, as they travel. In future airports, risk will be constantly assessed by specialist artificial intelligence (AI), using the passenger’s digital identity. The sensitive elements of this data will be used only by governments, which will use automated collaborative systems to approve – or, in some cases, not approve – the various steps of the journey. Airlines will no longer hold the responsibility for processing passenger data for border security purposes.

Travel steps will be decentralized
Everything will have tags: people, bags and cargo. And they will be tracked throughout their entire journey, whatever mode of transport they are using. This will mean travel authorization and customs checks can be made in advance of the flight, saving time at the airport. And remote bag drop-off and collection will be offered wherever it is most convenient for the passenger, at train stations for example.

The airport will be highly connected
Our new era of connected airports will be driven by increasingly cheap sensors, less dedicated hardware and new data lakes, fed by every device over 5G. The data will be captured through Software Defined Networks, collated and analyzed to make the airport highly efficient and to make it a much better experience for passengers.

The airport will think for itself
Artificial Intelligence (AI) algorithms will be key to efficiency, with sophisticated AI becoming the secret sauce for airports. Airports will use Digital Twin technology to bring real-time operations to life for all stakeholders, improving operational efficiency and enhancing the passenger experience. A Digital Twin is an advanced computer simulation that takes data from across the entire airport and airline operations to visualize, simulate and predict what will happen next.

That predictive data will then be used to streamline operational activities, automating them where possible. Automated messages such as: “Two A380s will land at the same time because one is delayed: ensure there are enough people on immigration desks” or “The feedback from the restrooms on the second level is negative: send the cleaners”. The rapid exchange of information will mean proactive responses and therefore more responsive and accurately planned operations for airlines and airports.

Collaboration will be critical
Across every single journey, there are 10 or more different entities that are responsible for making the trip a reality. The only way to collect all the data to make this journey seamless is through close collaboration between everyone working at an airport: the airport itself, airlines, government agencies, ground handlers, restaurants, and shops. We also need collaboration across the entire ecosystem of connected airports.

Throughout this wide network, operational data will be shared using trust frameworks and stakeholders will share single sources of truth for essential operations. This will make airports much more efficient, for example digitizing turnaround management, putting a sharp focus on getting aircraft back in the air as quickly as possible.

Here technologies such as blockchain provide tremendous potential in facilitating the secure exchange of information.

The airport will be highly automated
High-speed mobile connectivity at the airport will be central to mission-critical performance. Airports will increasingly run just-in-time operations, with automation and self-service making everything more efficient. And connected, automated and autonomous vehicles and robots are set to become commonplace throughout the airport.

Automation will also enable more efficient sharing and use of assets. A wide range of objects – from baggage or aircraft tugs – will be connected via 5G networks, providing massive amounts of data, offering real-time, predictive and historic views of airport operations.

The airport will adapt to passengers’ needs
The fast and frictionless journey to, and through, the airport will make some current revenue streams, for example, parking, weaker or obsolete. Airports will, therefore, need to find new ways to augment the travel experience to replace them. Personalization will be the key, providing passengers with what they want, when they need it at any point throughout their journey from start to finish, not just at the airport.

Examples could include an airport-provided limo service comprising bag check-in at your home, office or hotel, and fast-track approvals and facilitation for regular travelers.

Mobility will be a service on demand
Airports will become giant flying park and ride centers, providing access to a wide range of transport options. Innovations such as air taxis will be emerging by 2030 to provide much more efficient transport to and from the airport. They may even provide competition on short-haul routes. We will truly have air travel for everyone.

There will be an API for everything we do at the airport
Since tomorrow’s travelers will be digital natives, people running airports will need to be digital natives themselves. This technologically-literate environment will result in airport complexity being sliced into a set of data services that can be shared as application programming interfaces (APIs). It will provide an ecosystem that enables collaboration and innovation, which is easier for everyone to use. For example, AI and new syntaxes will enable requests of industry-specific insight in human terms: ‘Is there a pink bag as carry on at gate B34?’ or ‘The line at arrival concourse A is too long, send more taxis’.

The future of airports lies in connected, highly-intelligent and efficient operations that offer passengers pain-free and frictionless travel and rich, personalized experiences. Today’s blockages and operational silos will dissolve, resulting in data sharing based on digital trust, shared assets and real-time calculations from AI.

We’re entering a golden silicon-infused era for air travel and we’re excited to be part of the journey. However, it’s essential the industry acknowledges the need for change and collaborates. These technological shifts will happen, and faster than we think.

source : https://www.passengerterminaltoday.com/features/airports-of-the-future-sitas-10-predictions-for-the-next-decade.html

TSA Wants to Shoot Down Drones Near Airports

The TSA wants to give air marshals the power to use Defense Department equipment to shoot down drones near airports, two congressmen said, seeking to tackle drones that can disrupt airport operations.    According to a news report, in a letter to the Department of Homeland Security that summarizes the plan, Reps. Sam Graves (Mo.) and Mike Rogers (Ala.) on the House Transportation and Homeland Security committees “said the idea goes far beyond what they envisioned when they gave the federal government new powers to counter drones last year.”   The report notes that Graves and Rogers said only the Federal Aviation Administration has the expertise to manage the nation’s skies: “Nobody wants drones to cause disruptions at our airports, but to hastily hand over authority to shoot down drones to an agency that doesn’t have the critical knowledge or experience of how our airspace system functions is irresponsible and dangerous.”   In December 2018, London’s Gatwick Airport was closed Thursday during one of the busiest times of year after drones were spotted over the runway. According to The Associated Press, the prospect of a collision between an “industrial”-grade drone and an airliner led authorities to stop all flights in and out of the airport. Police said that the intrusion was a deliberate attempt to disrupt operations at the airport during a peak period, but that the disruption was not terror-related.  

source : https://www.securitymagazine.com/articles/91399-tsa-wants-to-shoot-down-drones-near-airports

Dubai Airports to remove all single-use plastics by early 2020

Dubai International Airport and Al Maktoum International Airport will remove all uses of single-use plastics following the original pledge in June 2019.

Dubai airports to remove all single-use plastics by early 2020

Following the original pledge by Dubai Airports in June 2019, the self-imposed deadline for Dubai International Airport (DXB) and Al Maktoum International Airport (DWC) to ban all single-use plastics is drawing near. 

In a bid to manage the two airports’ environmental impact, Dubai Airports has been working in close partnership with over 250 of its concession and hospitality partners in order to completely rid the airports of single-use plastics by early 2020.

Executive Vice President of Commercial at Dubai Airports, Eugene Barry, said: “This pledge is another step on a long journey to becoming a more environmentally responsible airport. Along with our partners, including global brands such as McDonalds, Costa Coffee and Starbucks, we are committed to not only removing single-use plastics but, in their place, providing appropriate and importantly sustainable alternatives.”

Each year, 90 million passengers pass through DXB and DWC and use tens of thousands of single-use plastic items, such as straws, water bottles and coffee lids daily. As a result of this huge number, the new initiative has presented serious challenges to those trying to put it in place.

Barry continued: “Among the challenges faced, the biggest is sourcing alternatives for plastic bottles, one of the most frequently used and discarded pieces of single-use plastics. As we work to reduce and ultimately eliminate plastics from our airports, we are increasing our recycling facilities in the customer spaces and a new partnership that will allow us to properly dispose of thousands of tonnes of single-use plastic, each year.”

The project, which will be implemented in phases, will see plastic cutlery, drinking straws, take-away food packaging and polythene bags removed from cafés, restaurants and shops within the airports by 1 January 2020. The following 12 months will see additional products replaced in both customer spaces and non-public spaces within the airports.

source : https://www.internationalairportreview.com/news/108639/dubai-airports-to-remove-all-single-use-plastics-by-early-2020/

AIRPORTS OF THE FUTURE: 10 PREDICTIONS FOR THE NEXT DECADE

Posted by: Team | NewsPatrolling

National, 11 December 2019: SITA, the leading IT provider for the air transport industry, today unveils 10 bold predictions about the technology shaping how passengers will move through the airport of the future, based on unique insights, driving industry forces and emerging technologies.

The airport experience has morphed dramatically in the past 10 years with the introduction of biometric security, mobile check-in, and baggage tracking. And there is much more to come.

The next decade will witness an exponentially accelerated pace of change as digital native passengers and staff usher in transformative technologies, from flying taxis to airports that think for themselves. Benoit Verbaere, Business Development Director, SITA predicts major change for nearly all aspects of the airport experience.

Verbaere said: “Passenger numbers are set to double in the next twenty years, according to the International Air Transport Association (IATA), but airport expansion won’t keep up. And passengers, quite rightly, want a smooth and easy journey through the airport. The only way we can make sure airports continue to work smoothly is by developing and implementing new technologies that make them more efficient while also enhancing the passenger experience.”

Time travel: a stroll through the airport of the future

1.Security will be integrated into a frictionless journey

Over the next decade, going through security will mean walking along a corridor. No more taking off your coat, shoes, and belt, or putting little bottles into little bags. And no more queues. Passengers and their bags will be recognized automatically as they go through automated checkpoints. Hard checkpoints will be replaced by sensor corridors, making physical document checks obsolete. 

2.Passengers will be in control of their digital identity

The adoption of digital self-sovereign identity and persistent travel tokens will put passengers back in control of what aspects of their identity should be revealed, for what purpose, as they travel. In future airports, risk will be constantly assessed by specialist artificial intelligence (AI), using the passenger’s digital identity. The sensitive elements of this data will be used only by governments, which will use automated collaborative systems to approve – or, in some cases, not approve – the various steps of the journey. Airlines will no longer hold the responsibility for processing passenger data for border security purposes. 

3.Travel steps will be decentralized

Everything will have tags: people, bags and cargo. And they will be tracked throughout their entire journey, whatever mode of transport they are using. This will mean travel authorization and customs checks can be made in advance of the flight, saving time at the airport. And remote bag drop-off and collection will be offered wherever it is most convenient for the passenger, at train stations for example. 

4.The airport will be highly connected

Our new era of connected airports will be driven by increasingly cheap sensors, less dedicated hardware and new data lakes, fed by every device over 5G. The data will be captured through Software Defined Networks, collated and analyzed to make the airport highly efficient and to make it a much better experience for passengers.

5.The airport will think for itself

Artificial Intelligence (AI) algorithms will be key to efficiency, with sophisticated AI becoming the secret sauce for airports. Airports will use Digital Twin technology to bring real-time operations to life for all stakeholders, improving operational efficiency and enhancing the passenger experience. A Digital Twin is an advanced computer simulation that takes data from across the entire airport and airline operations to visualize, simulate and predict what will happen next.

That predictive data will then be used to streamline operational activities, automating them where possible. Automated messages such as: “Two A380s will land at the same time because one is delayed: ensure there are enough people on immigration desks.” or “The feedback from the restrooms on the second level is negative: send the cleaners.” The rapid exchange of information will mean proactive responses and therefore more responsive and accurately planned operations for airlines and airports.

6.Collaboration will be critical

Across every single journey, there are 10 or more different entities that are responsible for making your trip a reality. The only way to collect all the data to make this journey seamless is through close collaboration between everyone working at an airport: the airport itself, airlines, government agencies, ground handlers, restaurants, and shops. We also need collaboration across the entire ecosystem of connected airports.

Throughout this wide network, operational data will be shared using trust frameworks and stakeholders will share single sources of truth for essential operations. This will make airports much more efficient, for example digitizing turnaround management, putting a sharp focus on getting aircraft back in the air as quickly as possible.

Here technologies such as blockchain provide tremendous potential in facilitating the secure exchange of information.

7.The airport will be highly automated

High-speed mobile connectivity at the airport will be central to mission-critical performance. Airports will increasingly run just-in-time operations, with automation and self-service making everything more efficient. And connected, automated and autonomous vehicles and robots are set to become commonplace throughout the airport.

Automation will also enable more efficient sharing and use of assets. A wide range of objects – from baggage or aircraft tugs – will be connected via 5G networks, providing massive amounts of data, offering real-time, predictive and historic views of airport operations

8.The airport will adapt to passengers’ needs

The fast and frictionless journey to, and through, the airport will make some current revenue streams, for example, parking, weaker or obsolete. Airports will, therefore, need to find new ways to augment the travel experience to replace them. Personalization will be the key, providing passengers with what they want, when they need it at any point throughout their journey from start to finish, not just at the airport. 

Examples could include an airport-provided limo service comprising bag check-in at your home, office or hotel, and fast-track approvals and facilitation for regular travelers.

9.Mobility will be a service on demand

Airports will become giant flying ‘park and ride’ centers, providing access to a wide range of transport options. Innovations such as air taxis will be emerging by 2030 to provide much more efficient transport to and from the airport. They may even provide competition on short-haul routes. We will truly have air travel for everyone.

10.There will be an API for everything we do at the airport

Since tomorrow’s travelers will be digital natives, people running airports will need to be digital natives themselves. This technologically-literate environment will result in airport complexity being sliced into a set of data services that can be shared as application programming interfaces (APIs). It will provide an ecosystem that enables collaboration and innovation, which is easier for everyone to use. For example, AI and new syntaxes will enable requests of industry-specific insight in human terms: ‘Is there a pink bag as carry on at gate B34?’ or ‘The line at arrival concourse A is too long, send more taxis’.

Benoit Verbaere, Business Development Director, SITA, commented: “The future of airports lies in connected, highly-intelligent and efficient operations that offer passengers pain-free and frictionless travel and rich, personalized experiences. Today’s blockages and operational silos will dissolve, resulting in data sharing based on digital trust, shared assets and real-time calculations from AI.

“We’re entering a golden silicon-infused era for air travel and we’re excited to be part of the journey. However, it’s essential the industry acknowledges the need for change and collaborates. These technological shifts will happen, and faster than we think.”

source : http://www.newspatrolling.com/airports-of-the-future-10-predictions-for-the-next-decade/

Asia’s airports stretch their retail and leisure wings

Singapore’s Changi and South Korea’s Incheon look to lift nonaviation revenueYUICHI SHIGA, Nikkei staff writer December 10, 2019 06:47 JST

The operator of Singapore’ Changi Airport earns 60% of its revenue from retail operations and rent.   © Getty Images

TOKYO — Hosting tens of thousands of visitors per day, international airports offer a unique setting for retail and entertainment. Asian airports are eager to take advantage as an expanding middle class and the growth of budget carriers add fuel to fire, with the facilities morphing from mere waystations to shopping and leisure destinations in their own right.

In Singapore, Changi Airport’s new Jewel commercial complex is a 1.7 billion Singapore dollar ($1.24 billion), 135,700-sq.-meter facility that offers much more than a typical duty-free area. It features, among other things, the world’s tallest indoor waterfall and the country’s largest maze.

The International Air Transport Association, a trade group, forecasts global air passengers to double to 8.2 billion by 2037. Asia is expected to lead the growth, encouraging airport operators to devote more effort to ancillary businesses.

Asian airports are trying to become more like department stores, focusing on maximizing sales and rental income. Changi Airport Group is leading the way. In the fiscal year ended March, it earned 60% of its revenue from rent and retail operations.

Jewel has 280 tenants and attracts about 300,000 visitors a day. The airport operator hopes keeping the shops and attractions open late will pull in transit passengers. “In Singapore, Changi Airport is a tourist attraction in itself, and Jewel has enhanced that reputation and appeal,” Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong said at the official opening on Oct. 18.

South Korea’s Incheon International Airport — one of the world’s most popular, thanks in part to its huge duty-free shopping area and a movie theater — announced its Vision 2030 project in September. By 2024, the airport plans to add runways and passenger terminals, and it hopes to use artificial intelligence and other advanced technologies to become more efficient.

According to local media reports, Incheon aims to increase its annual passenger volume to more than 100 million per year and double its sales to 5 trillion won ($4.19 billion) by 2030. Incheon wants to become the world’s No. 1 facility by airport throughput unit, an index that measures an airport’s ability to handle both passengers and freight. Encouraging those passengers that traffic will mean taking steps such as bringing in more popular restaurants and boutiques.

In China, Beijing Daxing International Airport opened in September and started handling international flights in late October. The 80 billion yuan ($11.3 billion) facility has set an annual passenger target of 45 million by 2021. Eventually it wants to raise that number to 100 million. While Beijing Capital International Airport is mostly used by domestic passengers, Daxing Airport plans to focus on international flights.

Hong Kong International Airport plans to open SkyCity, a large complex nearby, in 2021. The airport hopes to become a commercial center, as yearly passenger numbers are expected to hit 100 million by 2030.

Japanese airports are also increasing their nonaviation revenues. Sales from tenants at Japan’s Narita Airport hit a record 143.2 billion yen ($1.32 billion) in the fiscal year ended in March. That was a 70% jump from five years earlier and comparable to sales at Isetan Mitsukoshi Holdings‘ flagship Mitsukoshi Nihombashi department store, one of the oldest in Japan. The airport operator’s retail unit now accounts for 42% of total revenue. That is comparable to its aviation business.

Next spring Haneda Airport will open a complex that is directly connected to the international terminal. It will feature a hotel, restaurants, stores and a spa.

Becoming a hub airport in fast-growing Asia can deliver a big economic shot in the arm by developing a neighborhood’s infrastructure and attracting international events. Haneda Airport estimates that an increase in departure and arrival slots next year will lift its earnings by 650 billion yen a year.

But there will be occasional turbulence. Political tensions or epidemics could scare off travelers. “Stable profits at nonaviation units will lead to sustainable growth,” said analyst Kotaro Toriumi. It offers operators a way to smooth out the bumps.

source ;https://asia.nikkei.com/Business/Business-trends/Asia-s-airports-stretch-their-retail-and-leisure-wings

Albert Heijn begins testing of digital store at Schiphol airport

Posted By: Emma Upshallon: December 10, 2019In: Beverage, Business, Food, Industries, Innovation, Retail, Technology

Albert Heijn has opened its digital store at Schiphol airport to allow visitors to test its check-out free shopping concept for two months.

The autonomous store is open to all visitors at Amsterdam’s airport, where they can experience the speed and convenience of shopping without a cash register until the end of January 2020.

In collaboration with American tech start-up AiFi and financial corporation ING, Albert Heijn began testing its digital store at its Zaandam head office in September. Currently located on Jan Dellaertplein in front of Schipol Plaza, the store’s autonomous nature allows it to be placed at locations in need of a temporary small store.  

AiFi uses a combination of AI, edge computing and scalable sensor fusion technology to operate the autonomous stores. With its NanoStore in Schiphol, customers can scan their debit cards at the door to open it automatically, then pick the products they want and leave the store.

Open daily from 8am to 8pm, the groceries will be automatically registered and paid for, with no need to scan the products. If desired, customers can also check their purchases at the exit.

“Speed ​​and convenience are paramount for our travellers,” says Irene Muysson, head of retail, food and beverage and commercial services at Amsterdam airport Schiphol.

Muysson added: “We are therefore happy to give a stage to this innovation from Albert Heijn and we are naturally extremely proud that we can be the first to offer visitors to Schiphol the benefits of digital shopping. Albert Heijn and Schiphol have been working together for years. We are constantly looking at how we can improve the shopping experience, for example by using new digital technologies.”

The Dutch retailer will continue to test its digital store for two months, with the intention of developing its technology and customer experience offering.  

source : https://www.foodbev.com/news/albert-heijn-begins-testing-of-digital-store-at-schiphol-airport/

New screening technology is being piloted at DFW Airport

DFW and TSA are conducting a demonstration of a next-generation people screening scanner that can detect both metallic and non-metallic objects.

New screening technology at DFW

Using technology that detects any hidden object, a more efficient and effective means of screening is being piloted at Dallas Fort Worth International Airport.

To do so, the airport has collaborated with the TSA; a partnership designed to strengthen airport security and improve the operational efficiency of the screening process.

“We are very pleased to be working with TSA’s Innovation Task Force and our operations team to explore new and innovative technologies that can help us deliver enhanced safety and security for our airport employees and our passengers,” said DFW’s Executive Vice President for Innovation, Paul Puopolo.

The new Thruvision technology, coupled with an X-ray machine, will reduce the need for physical inspections; enabling employees to be processed quickly and discreetly.

“This technology demonstration project is just part of our commitment to implement enterprise risk management best practices that take advantage of new and emerging technologies serving the aviation industry,” said Chad Makovsky, DFW’s Executive Vice President for Operations. “As an Innovation Task Force airport, our active partnership with TSA continues to inspire new ways of enhancing security effectiveness while providing a more seamless experience for our customers and stakeholders.”

source: https://www.internationalairportreview.com/news/108189/screening-technology-dfw-tsa/

Irish Aviation Authority warns drone users to follow the rules or face ‘very serious consequences’

There are a number of regulations associated with using drones in Ireland and they must be registered with the IAA.

THE IRISH AVIATION Authority has warned there will be serious consequences for anyone using drones but not following regulations, including possible prosecution, ahead of the Christmas period. 

source: Shutterstock/Dmitry Kalinovsky

The IAA said there are risks associated with the devices which have become popular gifts for children and adults at this time of they year. 

Over the past four years, the number of drones registered in Ireland has almost trebled from 5,000 in December 2015, to almost 14,000 this year. 

All drones must be registered with the IAA which sets and enforces regulations in this area. 

“Worldwide we have seen an upsurge in the use of drones and this is set to continue, Peter Kearney, CEO of the IAA said. 

“But drones are not like any other toy. They can have very serious consequences if they collide with a person, an animal, an aircraft or many other objects. Therefore, if you do get a drone this Christmas, you need to know the rules so that you can fly it safely,” he added. 

The IAA outlined a number of tips to ensure the devices are used appropriately but the IAA’s CEO has told members of the public who witness drones being flown incorrectly to report them to gardaí, which he said could lead to prosecution of offenders. 

All drones weighing 1kg or more must be registered with the authority, while those weighing less than this are permitted to be flown without a permit but no more than 15 metres above ground level, and no further than 300 metres from the operator. 

“Thankfully the vast majority of drone users are compliant with the regulations,” Kearney said. 

“But if you do see anyone not complying with the regulations, we would encourage you to contact your local garda station. Reckless use of a drone or inappropriate use of a drone camera may result in prosecution.”

It is illegal to fly a drone within 5km of an airport in Ireland. Last year, airports across the world including Heathrow and Gatwick in London were forced to ground flights after drones were sighted flying too close to the them on several occasions.

Earlier this year, The National Civil Aviation Threat and Risk Group in Ireland met, at the request of Transport Minister Shane Ross, to discuss potential drone activity near Irish airports.

The 10 tips outlined by IAA to avoid infringement on any the regulations are:

  • Fly your drone no higher than 120 metres
  • Make sure you can see your drone when flying
  • Do not fly your drone over an assembly of 12 or more people, such as a parade, a concert or sports event
  • Do not fly your drone within 5km of an airport or military controlled airspace.
  • Do not fly within 30 metres of a person, vehicle, vessel or structure not under your direct control
  • Do not operate your drone outside of your direct line of sight
  • Do not fly your drone in a restricted area such as a prison or military installation
  • Always seek permission from the landowner for take-off and landing
  • If your drone is over 1kg, make sure you register it on the IAA website
  • Drone safety is your responsibility. Never operate your drone in a negligent or reckless manner so as to endanger life or property of others
  • source https://www.thejournal.ie/iaa-warning-over-drone-use-4911064-Nov2019/