Prague Airport has introduced digital signage in six languages

New passenger information screens at Prague Airport give information in six languages, ensuring more people can easily navigate the airport.

Digital signage, which was launched for passengers at Prague Airport and is located at the entrance to pier B in Terminal 1, is now available in six language versions, Korean, Chinese, Arabic, Russian, and naturally Czech and English. The signage offers information displayed on digital screens and reflects the current traffic and passenger flow throughout the day. The new technology is now being tested. If it proves successful, the airport is planning to install it in other locations as part of its daily operations.

Václav Řehoř, Chairman of the Board of Directors of Letiště Praha, said: “As the number of flights at Prague Airport continues increasing, so does the number of passengers with specific language requirements. The growing amount of air traffic calls for information to be provided faster and more efficiently. Therefore, digital signage is another project of Prague Airport´s technology development, which goes hand-in-hand with its construction development.”

The new digital signage system can be found at the entrance to pier B in Terminal 1 and includes a total of eight screens. It responds in six selected languages depending on the specific locations from where passengers have come or to where they are going at any given moment. This means that during the day, active language versions change depending on the composition of the passenger flow. In addition to the standard Czech and English versions, the navigation also offers Arabic, Russian, Korean and Chinese, which are the main languages for passengers who may not be able to speak English well enough.

NEWS

Prague Airport has introduced digital signage in six languages

New passenger information screens at Prague Airport give information in six languages, ensuring more people can easily navigate the airport.

Prague Airport has introduced digital signage in six languages

Digital signage, which was launched for passengers at Prague Airport and is located at the entrance to pier B in Terminal 1, is now available in six language versions, Korean, Chinese, Arabic, Russian, and naturally Czech and English. The signage offers information displayed on digital screens and reflects the current traffic and passenger flow throughout the day. The new technology is now being tested. If it proves successful, the airport is planning to install it in other locations as part of its daily operations.

Václav Řehoř, Chairman of the Board of Directors of Letiště Praha, said: “As the number of flights at Prague Airport continues increasing, so does the number of passengers with specific language requirements. The growing amount of air traffic calls for information to be provided faster and more efficiently. Therefore, digital signage is another project of Prague Airport´s technology development, which goes hand-in-hand with its construction development.”

The new digital signage system can be found at the entrance to pier B in Terminal 1 and includes a total of eight screens. It responds in six selected languages depending on the specific locations from where passengers have come or to where they are going at any given moment. This means that during the day, active language versions change depending on the composition of the passenger flow. In addition to the standard Czech and English versions, the navigation also offers Arabic, Russian, Korean and Chinese, which are the main languages for passengers who may not be able to speak English well enough.

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Thanks to its state-of-the-art technology, the signage system provides much more information than conventional information boards. In pier B, it shows passengers who are getting ready to depart which gate they have to go to and how many minutes they will need to get there. With the help of pictograms, passengers can learn about the services located in the vicinity, such as restaurants and bathrooms, as well as where they can find a first aid defibrillator. Passengers arriving in Prague can read which path to take to reach a specific part of the airport, such as passport control, how long it will take them to get there, which carousel will have their luggage, and what the current weather in Prague is. The digital signage system also displays, in a flexible and quick manner, necessary and clear information about any unexpected situation or non-standard operation at the airport.

Besides digital signage, Prague Airport is preparing other projects in the field of technological development. PRGAirportLab initiative participates in these projects.

Řehoř, continued: “For the second year now, PRGAirportLab has been focusing its projects with the help of modern technologies on five areas: safety, virtual shopping, mobility of the future, customer experience and a comfortable journey through the airport.”

The navigation system at Prague Airport will be tested until the end of October. After that, based on the pilot run results, it will be decided whether or not to use the digital navigation system in other key locations where passenger flow is the heaviest and at intersections from where other parts of the airport can be accessed.

source: https://www.internationalairportreview.com/news/100231/prague-airport-digital

SITA and Malaysia Airports to collaborate on digital airport initiative

Malaysia Airports and SITA have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to explore joint opportunities and collaborative innovation for Malaysia Airport’s digital initiatives. According to the announcement, Malaysia’s air passenger traffic is set to grow 4.9% in 2019, up from 2.5% last year.

SITA’s Smart Path biometric passenger processing technology was featured at the recent 21st anniversary celebration of the Kuala Lumpur International Airport and tested by Malaysian Prime Minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad. It uses facial biometric ID management technology to automate the travel journey from check-in to boarding and is made to integrate into existing infrastructure, including standard common-use systems, check-in kiosks, self-service gates, and boarding.

SITA's Smart Path biometric passenger processing technology at Kuala Lumpur International Airport being tested by Malaysian Prime Minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad

“We are honoured to be a long-term strategic partner of Malaysia Airports, and pleased to showcase Smart Path and embark on a collaborative innovation initiative at KL International Airport,” says Sumesh Patel, SITA President, Asia Pacific. “We look forward to the next project with Malaysia Airports as we work together to constantly seek ways to enhance service levels and elevate the customer experience at the airport.”

According to a recent blog post by SITA Air Travel Solutions Portfolio Director Sean Farrell, the aviation industry is on board with biometrics for single travel token.

source : https://www.biometricupdate.com/201908/sita-and-malaysia-airports-to-collaborate-on-digital-airport-initiative

New anti-drone tech deployed at Abbotsford Airshow

Operators could locate drones from up to 23 kilometres away

A new technology was deployed at the recent Abbotsford International Airshow, allowing police to pinpoint drones violating the event’s restricted airspace.

“The beauty of [the system] is it can actually read the data from the drone,” said Brian Fentiman, CTO of BlueForce UAV, the company which installs and operates the technology.

“Over the course of three days, we had seven or eight drone detections,” he said. “This will actually tell you the exact GPS co-ordinates of the drone, how high it is, how fast it’s flying and where the pilot is.”

Prior to the show, The Abbotsford Police Department (APD) warned citizens to keep their drones away from event. The company worked with the APD to detect drones and dispatch police units to the location of the operators in range. The system was picking up drones as far away as 23 kilometres in the U.S.

Const. Rob Hryhorczuk, who was head of security for the airshow, said he thought the technology’s impact was “really positive.”

“We’re getting drone complaints all the time, even as high as 2,000 feet. This will go a long way for airports and towers.”

Drone operators illegally entering airspace has been a consistent problem at airports and airshows across North America, according to Jadene Mah, spokesperson for the airshow.

“It’s a huge safety concern. In some cases it will stop all flying operations if one is detected in the area,” she said. “It’s not just an airshow issue; it’s an airport issue and one that Transport Canada is having to actively manage.”

A drone incident in December of last year caused Gatwick Airport in London to cancel 1,000 flights over a 33-hour period, affecting 140,000 passengers with an estimated price tag of over $80 million.

If an airplane were to collide with a drone, the results could be devastating, said Fentiman, adding that there have been several near-misses in Canada in the last few years.

“You can’t really ignore something that you have the ability to manage. That’s what we try to stress to people. You know there is a risk, even if it’s only a two per cent risk.”

RELATED: Drones not allowed at Abbotsford Airshow, police warn

source : https://www.aldergrovestar.com/news/new-anti-drone-tech-deployed-at-abbotsford-airshow/

Kuwait looks to adopt technologies found in Qatar airport

DOHA: Major General Mansour Al-Awadhi is seen during the tour around Hamad International Airport. – KUNA

DOHA: Kuwait Assistant Undersecretary for Ports Affairs in the Interior Ministry Major General Mansour Al-Awadhi praised the state-of-the-art security systems used by Hamad International Airport to maintain safety and security of passengers and civil aviation traffic in Qatar.

Awadhi made his remarks on Tuesday after a tour at the airport where he headed a Kuwaiti delegation, expressing appreciation for such experience and thanking Qatari airport officials who facilitated the tour. Awadhi also hailed Qatar’s experience in the issuance of visas and procedures for entry and exit of passengers to Qatar that affected the speed and completion of procedures to passengers’ security.

Awadhi said that the Kuwaiti delegation was briefed during the tour on the modern methods used, including devices, technical and electronic capabilities used at Hamad International Airport to facilitate the movement of passengers, and discussed the possibility of using them in Kuwait. He added that the visit comes within the framework of cooperation and exchange of experiences between the two countries.

He explained that the delegation listened to a presentation on the tasks offered by Airport Passports Department and the technological development adopted by the department on the entry and exit counters of passengers. The delegation also witnessed at first hand modern technology applied to electronic gates in the arrivals and departures lounges and a number of advanced devices used that contribute to enhancing security inside the airport and other ports.

The smart airport: from vision to reality

By Iyad Hindiyeh on August 15, 2019

The next two summers will be among the busiest ever for Japan’s airports. In September this year, the country will host the Rugby World Cup. Less than a year later, its capital city, Tokyo, will host the 2020 Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games. Iyad Hindiyeh, global head of strategy, airport IT, Amadeus, describes how operating a smart airport can improve the passenger experience, even in the face of unusually high visitor numbers.

Inbound air passenger numbers are expected to grow by 12% through 2019 to around 35.5 million. In 2020, they are expected to reach a record 40 million. This is in a country already the world’s 5th biggest for aviation.

Japanese airports, of course, are not alone in accommodating a growing passenger intake. Air travel is becoming increasingly affordable and popular. On current trends, global passenger numbers are expected to double by 2036, with Asia driving the majority of this growth.

A challenge and an opportunity
Rising passenger numbers present both challenges and opportunities for airports. They are often constrained by physical space, as numbers fluctuate day-to-day. At the same time, there are significant opportunities to provide travelers with higher-quality services at scale. The very best airlines and airports are embarking on digital strategies to help them achieve exactly this.

Japan Airlines (JAL) is one such airline. This year, it launched its ‘smart airport’ vision, complementing cutting-edge technology with intelligent airport design to provide its passengers with the best possible experience. It will enable the airline to carry its customers to 500 global destinations by April 2021. But what exactly does the ‘smart airport’ look like?

From the passenger perspective
Imagine you’re a passenger, traveling from the UK to next year’s Olympic Games in Tokyo. After taking in the sights and sounds of the capital, you want to make the most of your time in Japan and book a flight to Osaka. However, with so many people visiting the city, the volume of passengers at Tokyo Haneda Airport (which serves domestic flights) is higher than usual.

JAL’s smart airport vision will ensure its check-in desks at Tokyo Haneda Airport have the flexibility to manage these high volumes. By upgrading its departure control system (DCS), JAL will be able to provide its passengers with improved self-service capabilities. Automated bag-drop units enable you to check in bags at your leisure. In addition, extra check-in desks can be allocated to busy areas of the airport, providing extra capacity where needed.

At the check-in desk itself, JAL’s ground handlers will be equipped with a simplified interface, providing you with the latest information and offers on flight preferences, such as catering options and seat allocation, ensuring your experience with the airline is a personal one. With queues cut to a minimum and more self-service options, your journey through the airport will be seamless, giving you extra time to relax in the lounge.

Track and trace
With JAL’s ‘smart airport’ vision, however, it won’t just be you making a seamless transition through the check-in process. Your bags will make an almost identical journey, passing through security checks before eventually finding their way onto the airplane.

JAL’s investment in an upgraded baggage reconciliation system (BRS) will ensure there is a track-and-trace system for your bags, scanning them at key stages in their journey through the airport. Airports that have already invested in baggage reconciliation technologies have significantly reduced incidents of mishandled baggage. Another thing less to worry about.

Working with the airport
JAL’s ‘smart airport’ vision isn’t just of benefit to its passengers. The airline works closely with hundreds of airports worldwide. Airlines investing in cutting-edge technologies have delivered significant cost and efficiency savings to airports.  This makes an airline like JAL an ideal partner.

In order to accommodate its ambitions for growth, Japan Airlines set out its vision for a smart airport, one complementing cutting-edge technology with intelligent design. To turn its vision into reality, the airport invested in an upgraded departure control system and a new baggage reconciliation system. In doing so, the airport will ensure it is equipped to handle rising passenger numbers, while improving its passenger experience. This ensures it is an ideal partner for airports, and well-placed for all the challenges and opportunities ahead.

‘A considerable risk’: Germany plans to protect its airports from drones

'A considerable risk': Germany plans to protect its airports from drones

Archive photo shows a drone and an aeroplane. Photo: DPA Responding to a growing number of drone disturbances at airports, Germany is looking into expanding its prohibition zone for the flying robots.

The Federal Ministry of Transport has commissioned the German Air Traffic Control (DFS) to draw up an action plan, according to a report on Monday in the Süddeutsche Zeitung

The authority, which monitors the airspace for commercial aircrafts, is now also being tasked with “systematic drone detection” at airports. 

“From the point of view of the Ministry of Transport, the operation of unmanned aerial vehicles near airports poses a considerable risk to the safety of flight operations,” DFS explained to newspaper.

The Ministry says it’s reacting to a spike in drone sightings in the “immediate vicinity of airports.”

It’s also looking to take action after “recent events in which unmanned aerial vehicles have even temporarily brought traffic at airports to a standstill,” such as in Frankfurt in May when a drone shut down air traffic for an hour.

The deadline to submit the plan is September 30th.

SEE ALSO: 143 flights cancelled at Frankfurt airport due to drone sightings

Rules already in place

Currently drones are not allowed to fly within 1.5 kilometres of Germany’s airports. Air traffic control is already able to monitor an area up to 1,300 metres above sea level.

It is also forbidden to fly over major traffic routes, public buildings, industrial facilities, prisons, military facilities or rescue operations. 

Drones are nevertheless increasingly endangering flight safety, according to air traffic control. In 2018, 158 cases were reported in which airplane pilots felt concerned by a drone – 80 percent more incidents than in the previous year. 

Frankfurt Airport had the highest number with 31, followed by Berlin Tegel with 17 and Munich with 14 incidents.

Yet in the first half of 2019, the number stood at only 70 disruptions.

SEE ALSO: Drones cause record number of disruptions in Germany

While drones have already brought flight traffic to a halt in other part’s of Europe – for example at London’s Gatwick Airport in December – such an incident had not not occurred in Germany until May this year. 

Incoming and outcoming flights at Frankfurt Airport were completely put on hold for an hour due to the unidentified flying object of circulating in the air.

Federal or state police are responsible for bringing drones out of the sky in critical situations, though it is still unclear who would pay for such missions, reported the Süddeutsche Zeitung.

Difficult to detect

Typically the small drones, which travel up to 100 kilometre per hour, are difficult to detect by radar. Thoughtless hobby pilots, criminals or terrorists could cause enormous damage with the flying objects. 

According to studies, there are almost 500,000 private and commercial drones in Germany, yet there is no official drone defence system put in place.

So far, authorities have not been able to do much. Once drones are in the air, they go undetected by aircraft radar,

Furthermore, a drone registration system – or a radio signal so that authorities can quickly and electronically check who the drone belongs to – is not yet available.

Yet this could soon change in Germany. 

“A reliable technology, which is not yet available on the market, has to be procured – especially for the detection of uncooperative drones,” said DSF.

Experts are considering new radar monitoring, the installation of so-called jamming transmitters that force drones to turn off, or the installation of sensors which pick up signals from the drone’s remote control.

source : https://www.thelocal.de/20190819/a-considerable-risk-germany-plans-to-protect-its-airports-from-drones

Facial recognition scanners are already at some US airports. Here’s what to know

David Oliver  USA TODAYPublished 7:24 PM EDT Aug 18, 2019

The next time you go to the airport you might notice something different as part of the security process: A machine scanning your face to verify your identity.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) has been working with airlines to implement biometric face scanners in domesticairports to better streamline security. In fact, they’re already in place in certain airports around the country. 

But how does the process work? Which airlines and airports are involved right now? And do travelers need to be concerned about privacy breaches?

Here’s everything you need to know about the latest technological advances in airport screenings, from the government’s work to privacy concerns and more.

What is biometric airport screening?

It’s a fancy way of saying that the government is using facial recognition technology at the airport. Government agencies (in conjunction with airlines) are aiming to improve efficiency when it comes the way travelers enter and exit the U.S.

This is separate from the eye and fingertip scanning done by CLEAR, a secure identity company available at more than 60 airports, stadiums and other venues around the country. (CLEAR is certified by the Department of Homeland Security). 

Here’s how the process of facial scanning at the airports works: Cameras take your photo, and then the CBP’s Traveler Verification Service matches it to a photo the Department of Homeland Security has of you already. These could be images from sources like your passport or other travel documents.

This process will ideally replace the manual checking of passports nationwide.

This photo provided by Delta Air Lines shows new biometric scanning technology at Terminal F in Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport in Atlanta.John Paul Van Wert via Delta Air Lines

Where did this idea come from?

“A form of biometric entry-exit was technically required for non-U.S. citizens by the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act, which was signed into law in 1996,” says Jeramie Scott, senior counsel at the research firm Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) and director of the EPIC Domestic Surveillance Project. Scott notes, however, the years-old requirement wasn’t fully implemented. 

After 9/11, a commission recommended a full implementation of the biometric entry-exit scanning, but it wasn’t until 2017 that President Donald Trump signed an executive order that expedited the full roll out.

The CBP explained in a statement to USA TODAY U.S. citizens have historically been processed at border check points in-person but the facial recognition technology is being used because it “can do so with greater consistency and accuracy.” 

“CBP is simply replacing the current manual travel document comparison with facial comparison technology,” the agency stated. 

Facial recognition became the government’s method of choice – as opposed to finger print or other scanning – because it already had people’s photos in most instances, Scott explained. 

In order to quickly verify travelers’ identities, photo galleries are pre-built from flight manifests so once a face is scanned it can be checked against the stored photo of a passenger.

CBP stores the photos of U.S. citizens scanned for no more than 12 hours post-verification, after which they are deleted. 

Interested in TSA PreCheck? It might soon be cheaper and easier to sign up

What are airlines doing? 

With the exception of Southwest, most major airlines in the U.S. are taking steps to include the CBP facial recognition technology as part of their security processes. 

Delta Air Lines

Toward the end of last year, Delta announced one of its terminals in Atlanta’s airport was the “first biometric terminal” in the country. As of Dec. 1, all Delta passengers traveling internationally are able to take advantage of the biometric options when departing from the airport’s Terminal F. Delta has since expanded its facial recognition boarding practices to another Atlanta terminal as well as at airports in Detroit, Minneapolis and Salt Lake City. It also has a CLEAR partnership.

The face recognition technology replaces the traditional boarding method of showing your passport and ticket, according to Delta spokesperson Kathryn Steele. Passengers board after standing in front of a face scanner verifying their identities. A video of the system can be seen here. “This technology makes moving through the airport easier and is a part of our effort to create a seamless travel experience,” Steele told USA TODAY.

Customers still need their passports and should take it with them for use at other touch points internationally, per Steele.

United Airlines

United has been testing facial recognition tech during boarding at some gates for international travel in Houston, Washington Dulles and San Francisco, United spokesperson Maddie King told USA TODAY. “When we do offer these tests they are always optional, and customers are always able to use their boarding pass and passport instead if they choose.”

The airline is also working with CLEAR to further implement the biometric security option across its hub airports.

American Airlines

American has a pilot underway at Los Angeles’ LAX Terminal 4, where passengers’ faces will be scanned to verify identities in lieu of scanning boarding passes. The pilot has no end date, American spokesman Ross Feinstein confirmed to USA TODAY.

JetBlue Airways

Self-boarding is available on international flights leaving from New York-JFK, Boston and Fort Lauderdale, Julianna Bryan, spokesperson for JetBlue, told USA TODAY.

“Additionally, last fall, JetBlue became the first airline to partner with the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority to launch a one-step biometric boarding experience for customers flying to Nassau, Bahamas (NAS) from Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (DCA).”

The airline has fully implemented the tech on certain routes: “The flights from BOS-AUA and BOS-SDQ were considered ‘pilots.’ The trial ran from June 2017 to mid-2018. Since then, we have truly refined the technology, distancing the process from being a ‘pilot’ to having it become an essential part of our daily operations.”

Oooh: Airport security bins are gross; these antimicrobial replacements might help

Is the TSA involved too?

Yes. The agency is working with CBP as part of the security checkpoint pilot program in Atlanta’s Terminal F, and is also working with Delta Air Lines to use biometric identification at the airline’s bag drop. The TSA is evaluating the pilot’s applicability for use elsewhere.

Austin Gould, the assistant administrator for requirements and capability analysis at TSA, told USA TODAY that more than 90% of people at the are opting into the program though always have the option to opt out. 

“You need to knowingly step in front of the camera and agree to use your image as your identification in the pilot that we’re running,” he says.

In the future, the TSA hopes to expand the program, including for TSA PreCheck passengers as well as for use during domestic travel. You can look at TSA’s plans here.

Love TSA PreCheck and Global Entry? Check your expiration date

Can I opt out of the facial recognition program?

Yes. That said: “Even if you opt out of the facial recognition at the airport, your photo is still part of that gallery they created prior to the flight,” Scott says.

The CBP clarified in a statement: “The biometric entry/exit program is not a surveillance program, CBP does not biometrically track U.S. citizens. Facial biometric processing at ports of entry only replaces current manual comparison using the travel document.”  

In case you missed: Delta says USA’s ‘first biometric terminal’ is ready to go at Atlanta airport

Should I still be concerned about privacy?

It depends who you ask.

Both the CBP and TSA have conducted thorough privacy impact assessments related to facial recognition technology, though concerns loom among privacy advocates.

By consenting to the facial recognition, the government can create a digital identity for you and track you without your consent or knowledge, Scott adds. While they may not be using that power right now, there’s a lack of regulation preventing them from using it that way. A small way of pushing back is to emphasize your right to opt out.

The American Civil Liberties Union is against the CBP’s facial recognition program, according to Jay Stanley, a senior policy analyst with the organization’s speech, privacy and technology project. 

“The concern is that your face will be used to track and monitor you everywhere you go,” he told USA TODAY. 

Is the facial recognition program working?

For the CBP’s part, facial recognition is already proving successful in terms of stopping people entering the U.S. illegally. “Since initiating this facial comparison technology in the air environment on a trial basis, CBP has already identified seven imposters, including two with genuine U.S. travel documents (passport or passport card), who were using another person’s valid travel documents as a basis for seeking entry to the United States,” according to the CBP.

source : https://eu.usatoday.com/story/travel/airline-news/2019/08/16/biometric-airport-screening-facial-recognition-everything-you-need-know/1998749001/

How can we ensure the responsible use of drones?

Following recent disruptions, new legislations regarding drones are coming into force, including increased airport exclusion zones, additional police power, fixed-penalty notices and modern technologies to detect and repel drones. Lee Mansell, COO of Operational Solutions, details how airports should use an UTM system to safely integrate drones into their operations.

How can we ensure the responsible use of drones?

There is no doubt drones can bring both commercial and societal benefits. Responsible use of drones must, however, include legislative compliance. This legislation has to be enforceable to make any difference and even then, there is an argument it will not deter ‘bad actors’. However, if authorities are given the resources to enforce the legislation then there is a genuine threat of detection followed by detention. That could persuade the bad actor that the chances of completing their mission are too low to justify it. Some terrorists are as motivated by the publicity a successful attack generates as by the actual harm caused. A defeated attack presents a negative publicity risk and potential long-term disruption to terrorist capability.

To read this article in full, please complete the form below. By clicking submit you confirm that you accept our terms and conditions and privacy policy.

source : https://www.internationalairportreview.com/article/100032/responsible-use-of-drones/

The smart airport: from vision to reality

The next two summers will be among the busiest ever for Japan’s airports. In September this year, the country will host the Rugby World Cup. Less than a year later, its capital city, Tokyo, will host the 2020 Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games. Iyad Hindiyeh, global head of strategy, airport IT, Amadeus, describes how operating a smart airport can improve the passenger experience, even in the face of unusually high visitor numbers.

Inbound air passenger numbers are expected to grow by 12% through 2019 to around 35.5 million. In 2020, they are expected to reach a record 40 million. This is in a country already the world’s 5thbiggest for aviation.

Japanese airports, of course, are not alone in accommodating a growing passenger intake. Air travel is becoming increasingly affordable and popular. On current trends, global passenger numbers are expected to double by 2036, with Asia driving the majority of this growth.

A challenge and an opportunity
Rising passenger numbers present both challenges and opportunities for airports. They are often constrained by physical space, as numbers fluctuate day-to-day. At the same time, there are significant opportunities to provide travelers with higher-quality services at scale. The very best airlines and airports are embarking on digital strategies to help them achieve exactly this.

Japan Airlines (JAL) is one such airline. This year, it launched its ‘smart airport’ vision, complementing cutting-edge technology with intelligent airport design to provide its passengers with the best possible experience. It will enable the airline to carry its customers to 500 global destinations by April 2021. But what exactly does the ‘smart airport’ look like?

From the passenger perspective
Imagine you’re a passenger, traveling from the UK to next year’s Olympic Games in Tokyo. After taking in the sights and sounds of the capital, you want to make the most of your time in Japan and book a flight to Osaka. However, with so many people visiting the city, the volume of passengers at Tokyo Haneda Airport (which serves domestic flights) is higher than usual.

JAL’s smart airport vision will ensure its check-in desks at Tokyo Haneda Airport have the flexibility to manage these high volumes. By upgrading its departure control system (DCS), JAL will be able to provide its passengers with improved self-service capabilities. Automated bag-drop units enable you to check in bags at your leisure. In addition, extra check-in desks can be allocated to busy areas of the airport, providing extra capacity where needed.

At the check-in desk itself, JAL’s ground handlers will be equipped with a simplified interface, providing you with the latest information and offers on flight preferences, such as catering options and seat allocation, ensuring your experience with the airline is a personal one. With queues cut to a minimum and more self-service options, your journey through the airport will be seamless, giving you extra time to relax in the lounge.

Track and trace
With JAL’s ‘smart airport’ vision, however, it won’t just be you making a seamless transition through the check-in process. Your bags will make an almost identical journey, passing through security checks before eventually finding their way onto the airplane.

JAL’s investment in an upgraded baggage reconciliation system (BRS) will ensure there is a track-and-trace system for your bags, scanning them at key stages in their journey through the airport. Airports that have already invested in baggage reconciliation technologies have significantly reduced incidents of mishandled baggage. Another thing less to worry about.

Working with the airport
JAL’s ‘smart airport’ vision isn’t just of benefit to its passengers. The airline works closely with hundreds of airports worldwide. Airlines investing in cutting-edge technologies have delivered significant cost and efficiency savings to airports.  This makes an airline like JAL an ideal partner.

In order to accommodate its ambitions for growth, Japan Airlines set out its vision for a smart airport, one complementing cutting-edge technology with intelligent design. To turn its vision into reality, the airport invested in an upgraded departure control system and a new baggage reconciliation system. In doing so, the airport will ensure it is equipped to handle rising passenger numbers, while improving its passenger experience. This ensures it is an ideal partner for airports, and well-placed for all the challenges and opportunities ahead.

source : https://www.passengerterminaltoday.com/opinion/the-smart-airport-from-vision-to-reality.html?utm_source=mailing&utm_medium=email

Facial recognition is enforcing traffic laws in Shenzhen

Facial recognition cameras on the streets of Shenzhen have grown from a limited trial to catching thousands of alleged traffic violators

China’s traffic police are pushing ahead with a nationwide network of facial recognition surveillance cameras to deal with rule violations despite rising global anxiety over the new technology’s impact on privacy.

The central police authority announced on Wednesday that its platform successfully identified 126,000 suspect vehicles without a valid licence last year, for example. They now want to widen the network so that information on suspicious traffic activity can be shared with other cities and provinces.

The facial recognition technology checks the faces of drivers and vehicle details against a database, helping to verify the identity of wrongdoers much more quickly and improving the accuracy of traffic violation management, said Sun Zhengliang, Secretary of the Party Committee at the Ministry of Public Security Traffic Management Science Research Institute, in a traffic security forum on Wednesday in Hefei, Anhui province.

Shenzhen-based AI firm Intellifusion has been providing face-scanning technology to the city’s traffic police since 2018. In Handan in Hebei province, local police have teamed up with Guangzhou-based AI start-up Gosunyun Robot to introduce robots to help direct traffic and provide guidance to drivers.

The developments come amid rising resistance to the frictionless identification technology in many western countries, with Oakland recently joining San Francisco as US cities that have banned use of the technology by municipal authorities amid privacy concerns. A legal challenge has also been mounted in the UK against use of facial recognition tech by police, on the grounds that it constitutes an unlawful violation of privacy.

In the US, tech giant Amazon has also been criticised by its employees and shareholders for teaming up with the police to test the ability of facial recognition technology to track suspects in real time.

In China, it’s full steam ahead though and facial recognition is being applied to everything from airport security and crime prevention to garbage sorting. In the hi-tech city of Shenzhen, jaywalkers have already been named-and-shamed by pilot facial recognition schemes.

“For the US, they consider democracy first ahead of technology. In Shenzhen, it’s technology first,” said Wong Kam-Fai, a professor in engineering at the Chinese University of Hong Kong and appointed as a national expert appointed by the Chinese Association for Artificial Intelligence, in an interview during this month’s AI Summit in Hong Kong. “They are trying to push out the technology first and see if people can accept it.”

For those not yet on the road, facial recognition has also been deployed for learner drivers, allowing students to use their face to register and complete the required road theory study time before they sign up for a driving test.

Beijing has expressed enthusiasm about extending artificial intelligence technologies to many walks of life, from catching criminals, detecting cancers to developing self-driving cars. China is also home to the world’s largest surveillance camera makers amid state-directed efforts to build an “omniscient” surveillance network by 2020.

source : https://www.abacusnews.com/digital-life/facial-recognition-enforcing-traffic-laws-shenzhen/article/3023068