Sochi International Airport successfully trialed RFID Baggage Management System

International Sochi Airport (IATA: AER), part of Basel Aero airport holding,  has experienced tremendous passenger and baggage growth since 2013 with all the numbers more than doubled since then and exceeded 5 million passengers per year.  Optimizing business process and making airports’ infrastructure use more efficient has become a priority for airport’s management to handle rapidly increasing volumes.

Sochi International Airport limited by existing terminals dimensions, it was not both physically and economically feasible to install fully automatic Baggage Handling System, and Airport’s management continued to search for a solution being able to enhance Baggage Operations and introduce Baggage Tracking according to IATA Resolution № 753 requirements.

Longest Chance has offered a possibility for Sochi International Airport to pilot new innovative RFID-based Baggage Management and Tracking Solution to confirm and measure productivity increase by introducing Baggage Management to airport operations.

Among key benefits of Longest Chance Solution identified by International Sochi Airport’s it’s necessary to highlight the following:

  • Longest Chance Solution is fully addressing operational challenges connected to Baggage make-up, Baggage Loading and Offloading on board of an aircraft, gathering full Baggage relate statistics;
  • Provision of Operational Baggage Dashboards, Statistics and Analytics;
  • Baggage Loaders productivity increase exceeding 35%;
  • Full Compliance with IATA Resolution №753 requirements;
  • Elimination of misdirected baggage incidents;
  • Cost saving on expensive Baggage Messaging distribution services subscription.

We encourage you to watch a short video report below illustrating Longest Chance system in action in Sochi International Airport.

Longest Chance and Sochi International Airport are looking forward to a full-scale production implementation of LC Baggage Management and Tracking later in 2018.

More information about Baggage Solution available here.

Tokyo airport improving its baggage facility with latest technology

Tokyo (Japan), Feb 21 (ANI): Japan’s airport has been busier than ever. And as the total number of inbound tourists reaches record high each year in Japan, the amount of checked baggage and cargo has also increased. At the same time, due to the declining population of the country, there has been a shortage of staff in the workforce. Here in Tokyo International Airport, the latest wearable robot technology was co-introduced by JGS (Japan Airline Ground Service) and Japanese tech company, ATOUN to overcome these current conditions. This ATOUN MODEL Y improves productivity by helping reduce physical stress by 10kg that can occur over time on the carrier’s airport personnel. In a joint press conference ATOUN and Japan Airlines explained the reason behind the decision to employ this technology. The newly developed device mainly supports the lower half of the body. The gear is now being used when staff sort baggage from conveyor belt to load them to the container and also when storing baggage in the cargo warehouse. Here, the media staff was able to experience this powered wear. Many were impressed by the easiness of its use and the lightness. The award-winning developer, ATOUN is known for its modern yet simple wearable robotic device. The company plans to further downsize its current simplistic design to eventually fit the word “wear.” Through shared vision for the future, Japanese companies continue to strive and look to create a safe working environment for every member of society.

How Vueling is addressing business needs through the use of innovative technology

“Innovation is happening in every corner of Vueling,” says Simone van Neerven, Head of Innovation at the Spanish airline. Indeed, the low-cost carrier has an impressive track record of introducing creative new solutions to drive the passenger experience forward. As van Neerven explains: “We were the first airline in Spain to launch Google Pay, and we introduced WhatsApp as a new channel. We have tested new technologies such as biometric boarding, bag tracking and eye tracking. We have created a lot of energy around innovation in the company. And we have a lot of fun.”

Vueling, which is part of the International Airlines Group (IAG), recently presented one of the most strategic projects it has ever undertaken to drive its ambitions of becoming Europe’s number one airline for customer service in the low-cost segment by 2023. Named ‘Vueling For You’, the project is a part of the airline’s NEXT transformation programme, and is truly customer-centric. The airline has taken upon the task to review all key phases involving the customer – from booking and transit to the airport (pre-flight phase); to the onboard experience (inflight phase); and customer service (post-flight phase).

The airline’s vision of providing the best possible customer experience has, however, been disrupted by significant obstacles due to a variety of external factors affecting its day-to-day operations, especially in the peak summer season, such as ATC strikes, congested air space and bad weather. These challenges have inevitably had a knock-on effect on the overall customer experience.

To tackle this, Vueling, and the IAG group in general, are relying strongly on innovative solutions. Van Neerven explains that Vueling’s data team is working with technology, such as artificial intelligence (AI), to create more robust flight schedules to help the crew with decision-making in cases of disruption, while the IT team is proving truly agile and is able to quickly deliver new solutions. She adds: “We now have a development centre in Barcelona and Zaragoza. Within the IAG group our IT team performs the best, so we are also developing solutions for Level, IAG’s newly introduced airline.”

Vueling has already developed myriad initiatives to reduce the negative impact of such external factors and improve the passenger experience both on the ground and in the air. For instance, last year, the airline embraced Amazon Echo and Alexa to provide passengers with up-to-date information about their flights. When quizzed on the future of the technology, van Neerven comments: “We are exploring how it can support our customer care team. But these new channels are still very experimental, so it will need some time for our customers to start using it heavily. Also, the technology needs to mature. The other day I read an article about a baby that said “Alexa” as his first word. No doubt voice will be big, the question is when and for what cases.”

Since she joined the Vueling team in April 2018, van Neerven has introduced human centred design – an approach that starts with the customer and ends with innovative solutions that are tailor-made to suit their needs. She explains: “We do a lot of customer research. Not only interviews, but we also observe human behaviour to really understand our customers’ pains and needs. With human centred design, we come up with better solutions for our customers and the approach stimulates collaboration within the company. I am very happy with the first results and I will grow this capability in 2019.”

Speaking from her own personal experience, she adds: “Also, I fly about a hundred times a year. A lot of the time I fly with Vueling, so I can see where we can still improve and our crews also have lots of great ideas. By flying with other airlines I see what others do better and where we can improve. I often say to my team that we have to steal like an artist!”

Facial recognition is another area of focus for the airline, which last year trialled the technology on its route between Barcelona and Santander. “We are working on our vision of the future airport experience and facial recognition is definitely part of that. We are experimenting with a mobile solution, which differs from most other airlines that are also testing and implementing biometric boarding. This way we will be less dependent on airport infrastructure, which is important since we also fly to many much smaller airports and we believe in providing a consistent service to our customers.

“We are exploring all the tech trends and sometimes having a hard time to stay updated. I have some people in my team who are constantly scanning what is going on. They can also build stuff and do quick experiments to see if the tech is as promising as everybody makes you believe it is. But for me it is not only about tech. I think other ways of working, such as agile and design thinking, are also innovations.”

Moreover, van Neerven also recognises the benefit of working with startups to drive innovation. “Personally, I am a strong believer in collaborations with startups – they work faster and are much more flexible. They come up with creative solutions that corporates sometimes just oversee. Or they have ideas that are outside our current core business but might have a huge future impact for us.”

She continues: “But it’s not only startups. We also love to work with students as interns in my lab, or by giving them a challenging assignment. The other day we let 180 MBA students from ESADE university think about the future airport experience, leading to 90 ideas. As we speak we have given Fusionpoint, a collaboration between ESADE (management), IED (Institute of Design), and UPC (Polytechnic University of Catalonia), an assignment to come up with a vision on how customers in the future will communicate with us in all touchpoints.”

Ancillary revenue: “You have to do it right”

Another important factor, and certainly a major revenue driver, for any airline, especially budget airlines, is ancillary revenue. And so it is for Vueling. According to van Neerven, current trends show that customers are open to buying extra services and products. “But you have to do it right,” she points out. “That means, for instance, if a flight is delayed, the booked services like a taxi need to change automatically. This sounds easy, but it’s not. But I think this is the only way to go to win the hearts of our customers.”

Moreover, van Neerven says that the airline will be introducing Wi-Fi on board this year, which will certainly open more opportunities. “I have great expectation of the opportunities that this can bring. How cool would it be if our customers can plan their onward journey on board, while they have some relax time and explore their destination?”

Looking ahead, van Neerven says: “We will keep on doing what we have started last year. Working in the three phases of the passenger experience at the same time proves to be powerful. Facilitating the business by solving some of the current pains ensures we keep in touch with reality and we add immediate value.

“I am a strong believer that the only way to stay relevant in the future is to collaborate with others. We are exploring interesting, maybe even surprising partnerships. I would love to make some announcements in this field in the coming year.”

Bag drop: its time has come

here’s no doubt that passengers are emotionally attached to their baggage. For some of us, there’s always that lurking worry that we might take off on one flight and our baggage takes off on another.  Yet this doesn’t seem to be holding back passengers when it comes to self-service bag drop.

IATA’s 2018 Global Passenger Survey reveals that 70% of passengers said they want self-service baggage check-in. Only one in three travelers said they prefer an agent to tag their bag.

Seamless passenger journey

More automation, less stress

A smooth and swift passenger process

Check-in has gone mobile, with passengers now preferring to check in remotely or by kiosk to avoid counter queues. So it follows that passengers want to take the fastest route possible to check in their baggage and bypass any lines on the next step of their journey.

Bag-drop is the next contender in streamlining processes using automation and technology. Bag-drop technologies are proven in their ability to shorten queues, reduce costs and improve customer satisfaction.

SITA’s own Scan&Fly bag-drop, for example, enables passengers to easily check in luggage in as few as 15 seconds. This means more terminal capacity, reduced queues and lower operational costs.

Let’s not forget our focus on passenger satisfaction

It’s little surprise that assisted bag-drop implementation has grown to 72% in 12 months and unassisted bag-drop to 45%, according to SITA’s Air Transport Insights 2018 report. But as we continue to drive the trend, let’s not forget our focus on passenger satisfaction: if we as an industry want to ramp up bag-drop adoption, either self-service or assisted, we must make sure that for the passenger, the process is both simple and fast.

Percent of airlines with implemented or planned initiatives

Airport layout and staff encouragement are key to the mass adoption of bag-drop. Bag-drop areas must look easy and inviting, with smiling staff ready to lend a helping hand to those who may be apprehensive or find technology bewildering. Of course, each airport is different, which is why SITA stresses the importance of carrying out individual assessments initially for bag-drop solutions. This ensures that solutions are optimized for the space, fulfill customer requirements and support the air travel industry’s aspiration to achieve the seamless journey.

Though it will take several years before we see the end of manual bag check-in as an option, eventually, travelers will see bag-drop as the norm.

Make way for the bag drop zone

Of course, as with any new technology there are challenges around how bag-drop slots into traditional processes. Excessive baggage and how passengers pay any additional charges due, for example, has been cited as an issue. But this hurdle can now be overcome easily with a common use kiosk with a built-in payment terminal where passengers can pay any excess due with a credit card.

Nor are large or odd-shaped bags a problem. Bag drops can be equipped with sensors to identify objects such as Skis, buggies and golf clubs, for example, these can still be tagged at the bag-drop and then passengers referred to an alternative baggage belt to drop off the baggage.

The concept that 10 traditional counters can be replaced by  three agents and six bag-drop units has left airport counter staff concerned about their jobs. Soft skills, however, are invaluable in the process. As I said earlier, agents are needed to help people use the technology and counter staff can be seen in more of a hosting role, contributing to greater customer satisfaction.

Passengers using bag-drop will soon be recognized

Another advance on the way will be a relief to frequent travelers in particular. Those who regularly use the same airline often become frustrated when asked the same questions every time about their identity. But all that’s going to stop, as work in this area begins to come to fruition. It won’t be too long before systems will recognize passengers, making the bag-drop process far shorter and easier than ever.

SITA has designed its BagDrop portfolio to make way for the implementation of identity management across the entire departure process. By integrating passport identification and biometric recognition at each bag drop point, airlines and airports can speed up check in, free-up staff to better engage with customers and importantly, make security more robust.

The proof is in the experiences

Several airlines have already adopted bag-drop solutions from SITA, including Finnair, Brussels Airport and Air Asia (the latter having reduced the wait for check-in by 40%).

Consider also the experience of Incheon International Airport, the largest airport in South Korea. It has adopted SITA’s modular Drop&Fly, which replaces traditional check-in counters and enables passengers to check in their own baggage quickly and securely. The move is in preparation for the 100 million passengers it is projecting by 2030. The system provides live status and notification on all bag drop units for ground agents alongside real-time statistics to analyze airport trends.

So the trend to introduce self-service technology at this next step of the journey is well underway. Bag-drop is fast becoming automated with SITA predicting that unassisted bag-drop will be implemented by the majority of airlines by 2021. There’s no doubt that bag-drop can now be considered as another step towards effective, secure and smarter baggage handling and another step towards the seamless passenger journey.

source : https://www.sita.aero/resources/blog/bag-drop-its-time-has-come?mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiTUdObVlUUTJaamN3TkRNeSIsInQiOiJWTmw2aENJZzNCQlZcL0l4NnJYdHZxUHZlV2htWG81Ynh4Mmw2THZGeFZnZEFDNmx5VkJHMUc3Y09oc2ZQeEI0K1cyM1FMb2Zrd2FiSFZJUUVUeldPcUpqOGxQRVhPXC9SY1FoQmlZdSt6SVpTbmlERFpmRjdINEtyTkR3clp3Qlo4In0%3D

Shortlist revealed for The Moodies – the travel retail digital & social media awards

by Matt Willeymatt.willey@themoodiereport.com

Source: ©The Moodie Davitt Report

19 February 2019

SourceURL :https://www.moodiedavittreport.com/shortlist-revealed-for-the-moodies-the-travel-retail-digital-social-media-awards/ Shortlist revealed for The Moodies – the travel retail digital & social media awards – The Moodie Davitt Report – The Moodie Davitt Report

INTERNATIONAL. The shortlisted finalists for The Moodies – the only travel retail and airport digital, social media & marketing awards – are revealed today via various social media platforms and the MoodieDavittReport.com website.

The awards, now in their sixth year, recognise best practice in social & digital media and marketing among airports and their commercial partners.

Some 170 shortlisted finalists across 21 categories have been announced, generated via a mix of self-nomination or nomination by independent parties. The Moodie Davitt Digital Awards cover digital, mobile, social media and marketing activities across airports overall, plus airport retail and food & beverage.

The overall winners will be announced later this month after extensive evaluation by an in-house panel led by The Moodie Davitt Report Chief Technology Officer Matt Willey.

Commenting on the shortlist, Willey said: “This year’s final line-up represents a diverse geographical masterclass of digital innovation and excellence. It also throws up some intriguing trends in the industry’s use of digital media.

“The major talking points include the popularity of the new KOL-led Campaign category, mirroring the heavy investment that brands and retailers have been pouring into such programmes; the rise and rise of Instagram – to a marked degree at the expense of traditional social media channels Twitter and Facebook; and the emergence of more focused and tactical marketing campaigns. Additionally, the entries underline the vibrancy of airport communication in general as a means of reaching out to the consumer – those prophets of doom who predicted the decline of airport advertising in the mobile-centric age will have to think again.”

The shortlist is as follows:

Best Use of Facebook

  • Copenhagen Airport
  • Cork Airport
  • Delhi Duty Free Services
  • DFS Group
  • Duty Free Philippines
  • Ireland West Airport
  • The Shilla Duty Free

Best Twitter Feed

  • Amsterdam Airport Schiphol – @Schiphol
  • Cork Airport – @CorkAirport
  • Dallas Forth Worth – @DFWAirport
  • Delhi Duty Free Services – @DelhiDutyFree
  • Dubai Airports – @DubaiAirports
  • Dublin Airport – @DublinAirport
  • Duty Free Americas – @DFA

Best Use of Instagram

  • Bristol Airport – @bristolairport
  • BTA Havalimanlari –Cakes & Bakes – @cakesandbakestr
  • Changi Airport Group – #BelanjaDiChangi campaign
  • Copenhagen Airport – @copenhagenairport
  • Cork Airport – @CorkAirport
  • Delhi Duty Free Services – @delhidutyfree
  • Dubai Duty Free – @dubaidutyfree
  • Dublin Airport – @dublinairport
  • Duty Free Phillipines – @dutyfreephils
  • Lotte Duty Free – @lottedutyfree
  • OTG – @OTGexp
  • The Shilla Duty Free – @shilladutyfree

Best YouTube Video/Campaign

  • Airport Butler – Your Airport Concierge
  • Beauty Unlimited – The Shilla Duty Free
  • Cinema in HEL – Helsinki Airport
  • Security Top Tips – Aberdeen International Airport
  • #ReasonToShop – Delhi Duty Free Services
  • The Heathrow Bears Return – London Heathrow Airport
  • Youre So Beautiful – Lotte Duty Free

Best Use WeChat

  • King Power International Co
  • Lagardère Travel Retail – Red Pockets Augmented Reality
  • L’Oréal Travel Retail Americas – Giorgio Armani Lip Vibes
  • Qatar Duty Free – Golden Week
  • The Estée Lauder Companies – Your Beautiful Travel Moments

Best Agency

  • Big Bad Wolf
  • PSI
  • Smart Project Agency
  • Xplanck Marketing

Best Collaboration Campaign

  • Cartier – Santos Cartier x DFS Big Bang
  • Casual Dining Group – Bombay Sapphire Augmented Reality
  • Delhi Duty Free Services – Celebrating 110 Years of Striding Man
  • HMSHost – Food Fight for Veterans
  • Lagardère Travel Retail – Clinique Gifting
  • Mondelēz World Travel Retail – Cadbury Premier League
  • Schiphol Group – Bombay Sapphire Campaign
  • Starboard Cruise Services – Celebrity Cruises Collaboration
  • The Shilla Duty Free – ThankYou Fanmeet
  • The Shilla Duty Free – The Beauty House with LaPrairie

Best Omnichannel Campaign

  • Aeroports De la Cote D’Azur – Digital Growth Strategy
  • JFKIAT – Multi-Platform Development
  • Lagardère Travel Retail – Airport Million’Air
  • L’Oréal – YSL Beauty Hotel
  • L’Oréal Travel Retail Americas – Lancôme L.A Lip Art
  • Qatar Duty Free – The Lucky Million Campaign
  • Shiseido Travel Retail – NARS Lip Gallery

Best Competition

  • Bristol Airport – Facebook Competition
  • Cork Airport – 12 Days of Christmas Giveaway
  • George Best Belfast City Airport in partnership with Lighthouse Communications – 12 Days of Christmas
  • HMSHost – Channel Your Inner Chef
  • Kempegowda International Airport – 10 Week Celebration

Best Launch/Relaunch

  • Aberdeen International Airport – Northern Lights Lounge
  • Autogrill Belgie – Starbucks 10th Anniversary – Antwerp Central Station
  • Cairns Airport – Standby Zone
  • Cartier – Santos Cartier x DFS Big Bang
  • Copenhagen Airport – New Shopping & Restaurant Area
  • Diageo – White Walker
  • Heinemann Asia Pacific – Sweet Dreams by Heinemann
  • HMSHost – Eat Well Travel Further
  • JCDecaux – HKIA-Huawei Mate 20 Pro – Christmas Sparkling Interactive Zone
  • King Power International – Chinese Web/Mobile Revamp
  • L’Oréal Travel Retail Americas – Atelier Cologne
  • PSI – Dell Technologies
  • Qatar Duty Free – Dior Les Parfums Podium
  • TRUnblocked.com
  • Unibail Rodamco Westfield, LAX & Southwest– The New Terminal 1 at LAX

Best KOL-led Campaign

  • Changi Airport Group – NAS Daily
  • DFS – The Craft Festival
  • Heretix360 – HIMPUN Proudly Malaysian
  • HMSHost – Eat Well Travel Further
  • L’Oréal –Armani Box Sydney
  • L’Oréal Travel Retail Americas – YSL Dare to Stare
  • OTG – IAH Tour & Taste
  • The Estée Lauder Companies – Yang Mi Chinese New Year
  • The Shilla Duty Free – Beauty & You HKIA
  • The Shilla Duty Free – Beauty Class
  • The Shilla Duty Free – Bing’ing on Beauty

Best Branding Advertising Campaign

  • Aeropuerto Internacional de Carrasco – Navidad
  • Beam Suntory – Maker’s Mark Sydney Airport
  • Diageo – White Walker
  • Ireland West Airport – New Brand Identity
  • JCDecaux – BP Keep Advancing
  • JCDecaux – Giorgio Armani HKIA
  • JCDecaux – MIA Dinosaurs
  • L’Oréal Travel Retail Americas – Kiehl’s Loves
  • Mumbai Duty Free, Flemingo Travel Retail – MDFIF Shopping Festival
  • PSI – Johnnie Walker From Booking to Flight
  • Schiphol Group –Rituals
  • Shiseido Travel Retail – Ultimune #Strong Souls
  • Sydney Airport – American Express Wideopen Wrap
  • The Estée Lauder Companies – Jo Malone Travelling Townhouse

Best Tactical Advertising Campaign

  • Aeropuerto Internacional de Carrasco – Navidad
  • Autogrill Belgie – Black Pearls Brussels Airport
  • Delhi Duty Free Services – #ReasonsToShop
  • HMSHost – The Art of Holiday Travel
  • Ireland West Airport – County Mayo Gaelic Football
  • JCDecaux – Soccer Fiesta, Xiaomi
  • JCDecaux – TMall New Retail Concept
  • LOréal Travel Retail Americas – Ralph Lauren Father’s Day
  • oOh! – Lexus Melbourne Cup
  • PSI/Gyro – Workplace by Facebook

Best Native Campaign

  • Bristol Airport – Facebook Competition
  • HMSHost – The Last Straw
  • Schiphol Group – UnionPay GoldenWeek

Best CSR-Focused Campaign

  • Aeropuerto Internacional de Carrasco – First Flight – School of Football
  • Delhi Duty Free Services – CSR Initiatives
  • Distell – Amarula World Elephant Day
  • Hatti Food and Beverages – Employment Principles
  • HMSHost – Food Fight for Veterans
  • L’Oréal – Sharing Beauty With All
  • The Shilla Duty Free – Overseas Chinese Engagement Programme

Best Employee Engagement

  • 27 Stella / FlyInStyle – BNA Insiders
  • Ethos Farm – Worklife App
  • Greater Toronto Airport Authority (GTAA) – I Am Toronto Pearson Movement
  • HMSHost – #HMSHostShoutOut
  • Kempegowda International Airport – Employee Celebration Initiative
  • Lagardère Travel Retail – The Innovation Boosters
  • Versilia Solutions –JetSMART Crew Engagement

Best Use of Real-Time/Geolocation

  • Changi Airport Group – NAS Daily
  • Delhi Duty Free Services – Multiple Promotions
  • Ferrero – Nutella
  • Shiseido Travel Retail – Dolce & Gabbana Light Blue & The One
  • William Grant & Sons – Make It Monkey

Best e/MCommerce

  • Aberdeen International Airport – Frictionless Online Booking
  • AOE – LHR Boutique
  • King Power International – Web/Mobile Platform
  • Lagardère Travel Retail – WeChat Mini Programme
  • MyDutyFree.net – Travel Retail Marketplace
  • The Shilla Duty Free – Internet Duty Free

Best Use of Mobile

  • Beijing Miracle Capital Investment Consulting
  • Casual Dining Group – Bombay Sapphire CDG Augmented Reality
  • Ethos Farm – Worklife App
  • Groupe ADP – Paris Airport Mobile Application
  • King Power International – Mobile Website
  • OTG – Digital Amenities, flo

Best Website Overall

  • Aberdeen International Airport – AberdeenAirport.com
  • BTA Havalimanlari – BTA.com.tr
  • Copenhagen Airport – cph.dk
  • Delhi Duty Free Services – delhidutyfree.co.in
  • Ireland West Airport – irelandwestairport.com
  • Shoppair.com
  • Skyport – bermudaairport.com

Best Use of Social & Digital Media

  • Aircommerce
  • Copenhagen Airport
  • DAA/Dublin Airport
  • Delhi Duty Free Services
  • DFS Group
  • George Best Belfast City Airport
  • Heretix360
  • Ireland West Airport
  • JCDecaux
  • King Power International
  • Lagardère Travel Retail
  • L’Oréal – Le Défilé with Lotte Duty Free
  • Mondelez World Travel Retail
  • Shiseido Travel Retail
  • The Shilla Duty Free

source : https://www.moodiedavittreport.com/shortlist-revealed-for-the-moodies-the-travel-retail-digital-social-media-awards/

New shopping experience awaits Hamburg Airport’s passengers

New shopping experience awaits Hamburg Airport's passengers

Hamburg Airport is promising a new shopping experience for passengers when the redesigned retail area beyound security comes onboard in the next few months.

Hamburg-based company Gebr Heinemann is opening a handful of new shops in the airside passenger pier during March and April, which the airport reveals will bring a host of new brands and a fresh, modern design.

FAW

“At Hamburg Airport, we never sit still in our commitment to provide passengers with an optimal travel experience and a maximum of comfort and this, of course, includes a colourful range of shopping options,,” enthuses Lutz Deubel, head of center management at Hamburg Airport.

“We have been in partnership with Gebr Heinemann for many years, and the company has a great deal of experience and awareness of customer needs. We are thrilled about the fresh new design that the shops will soon be presenting — along with even more products and offers for customers to discover.”

New brands, Hamburg souvenirs and a modern atmosphere

Gebr. Heinemann’s Destination Hamburg concept store is moving from Gate B53 into the Airport Plaza at Hamburg Airport, offering typical Hamburg souvenir articles such as from St. Pauli, HSV and Gin Sul.

The relocation, says the airport, places the shop in an even more prominent location, easily accessible for passengers directly after the central security checkpoint in the Airport Plaza.

The duty free operator is also opening Heinemann Duty Free in the Airport Plaza, with premium sunglasses from numerous designer brands. 

In the third shop, currently being remodelled adjacent to Gate A18, Heinemann will be launching its innovative “FAWJ” concept: Fashion, Accessories, Watches and Jewellery.

Suinny

The new shop concepts offer customers the price benefit of Heinemann’s duty-free pricing.

“My team and I are very excited about the new shops,” says Thomas Brock, managing director of Gebr Heinemann Hamburg Airport.

“The Destination Hamburg Store is so well established, you could almost call it a classic. With the trendy new design, it will be even more attractive to the young target market.

“And with the sunglasses and FAWJ shops, we are finally able to demonstrate our competence in these areas at Hamburg Airport again.We have an extensive product range for every passenger under the Heinemann Duty Free umbrella.”

Destination Hamburg is scheduled to open mid-March 2019, followed by Heinemann Duty Free Sunglasses and FAWJ at the start of April 2019

source http://www.airport-world.com/news/general-news/7018-redesigned-shopping-experience-awaits-hamburg-airport-s-passengers.html?dm_i=2XWC,UD76,1EVH0F,354RK,1

Dublin Airport launches A-CDM initiative to improve traffic flows

Dublin Airport launches A-CDM initiative to improve traffic flows

Dublin Airport has launched a new initiative with the Irish Aviation Authority (IAA) in a bid to reduce delays and improve traffic flows.

The initiative involves incorporating Airport Collaborative Decision Making (A-CDM) into the management of daily flight operations at the airport.

A-CDM is a Europe-wide initiative under the guidance of Eurocontrol, which is the European organisation for the safety of air navigation. 

In this case, A-CDM will focus on aircraft turnaround times and pre-departure sequencing processes to boost air traffic flow and operational efficiency of all airport operators by reducing delays and increasing the predictability of events.

aircraft flying XL

It is hoped that the implementation of A-CDM will also increase capacity at participating airports and the capacity of European airspace by offering improved real-time information sharing between airport operators, aircraft operators, ground handlers and air traffic control.
 
In a nutshell, fewer late gate changes and faster taxi times will benefit airlines, passengers, the airport and the overall European aviation network.

“We are delighted Dublin Airport is the first airport in Ireland to use the A-CDM process,” enthuses Dublin Airport’s managinbg director, Vincent Harrison.

“We are fully committed to this initiative which will improve aircraft arrival, departure and turnaround times leading to greater efficiencies, and ultimately, improving the overall passenger experience.”

General manager for Irish Aviation Authority Terminal Services, Paul McCann, believes that implementing A-CDM at Dublin Airport will contribute to the reduction of aircraft ground congestion at peak times and should also reduce delays. 

“By co-operating together on this project daa and the IAA are supporting, not just Dublin Airport, but the European air traffic network in general,” he says.

Dublin gates

A-CDM will make it easier for airports, aircraft operators, ground handlers, the IAA and Eurocontrol to know exactly where an aircraft is through every step of the departing flight process.

Benefits will be achieved for airlines, ground handling operators, the IAA and Dublin Airport through improved use of aircraft parking stands and boarding gates resulting in fewer late changes in those areas. 

The improved collaboration between these organisations provides a better understanding of aircraft traffic flows resulting in reduced taxi times and fewer queues and congestion on runway, taxiway and apron areas. 

“Importantly, A-CDM will help reduce fuel burn and CO2 emissions from aircraft and vehicles operating on the airfield. Dublin Airport is mandated to implement A-CDM by January 1, 2021 and we are delighted to have the initiative in train about two years ahead of schedule,” notes Harrison.

A-CDM has already been implemented at 28 European airports accounting for 37% of departures across Europe.

Dublin Airport and the IAA will now enter into a six-month data verification exercise with the European network manager, with the aim of becoming a fully certified A-CDM airport by this summer. 

The Irish gateway secured €356,000 in European funding for the programme under the Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) for Transport.

source : http://om/news/general-news/7009-dublin-airport-launches-a-cdm-initiative-improve-traffic-flows.html?dm_i=2XWC,UD76,1EVH0F,354RK,1

New shopping experience awaits Hamburg Airport’s passengers

New shopping experience awaits Hamburg Airport's passengers

Hamburg Airport is promising a new shopping experience for passengers when the redesigned retail area beyound security comes onboard in the next few months.

Hamburg-based company Gebr Heinemann is opening a handful of new shops in the airside passenger pier during March and April, which the airport reveals will bring a host of new brands and a fresh, modern design.

FAW

“At Hamburg Airport, we never sit still in our commitment to provide passengers with an optimal travel experience and a maximum of comfort and this, of course, includes a colourful range of shopping options,,” enthuses Lutz Deubel, head of center management at Hamburg Airport.

“We have been in partnership with Gebr Heinemann for many years, and the company has a great deal of experience and awareness of customer needs. We are thrilled about the fresh new design that the shops will soon be presenting — along with even more products and offers for customers to discover.”

New brands, Hamburg souvenirs and a modern atmosphere

Gebr. Heinemann’s Destination Hamburg concept store is moving from Gate B53 into the Airport Plaza at Hamburg Airport, offering typical Hamburg souvenir articles such as from St. Pauli, HSV and Gin Sul.

The relocation, says the airport, places the shop in an even more prominent location, easily accessible for passengers directly after the central security checkpoint in the Airport Plaza.

The duty free operator is also opening Heinemann Duty Free in the Airport Plaza, with premium sunglasses from numerous designer brands. 

In the third shop, currently being remodelled adjacent to Gate A18, Heinemann will be launching its innovative “FAWJ” concept: Fashion, Accessories, Watches and Jewellery.

Suinny

The new shop concepts offer customers the price benefit of Heinemann’s duty-free pricing.

“My team and I are very excited about the new shops,” says Thomas Brock, managing director of Gebr Heinemann Hamburg Airport.

“The Destination Hamburg Store is so well established, you could almost call it a classic. With the trendy new design, it will be even more attractive to the young target market.

“And with the sunglasses and FAWJ shops, we are finally able to demonstrate our competence in these areas at Hamburg Airport again.We have an extensive product range for every passenger under the Heinemann Duty Free umbrella.”

Destination Hamburg is scheduled to open mid-March 2019, followed by Heinemann Duty Free Sunglasses and FAWJ at the start of April 2019.

source : http://www.airport-world.com/news/general-news/7018-redesigned-shopping-experience-awaits-hamburg-airport-s-passengers.html?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

Battle for the skies: how to protect airports from drones

Coming in to land: the Gatwick Airport shutdown highlighted the need for new security systems in an era of ubiquitous drone availability

Coming in to land: the Gatwick Airport shutdown highlighted the need for new security systems in an era of ubiquitous drone availability

Analysis: drone technology is developing in leaps and bounds and anti-drone technology must keep up to ensure public safety

By Boris GalkinCONNECT

In December 2018, the world watched on as Gatwick Airport in the UK battled with a repeated drone incursion that grounded all flights and stranded tens of thousands of travellers. This incident once again highlighted the need for new security systems in an era of ubiquitous drone availability. So what solutions exist today for stopping malicious drone operations, and what solutions are expected to appear soon?

From the perspective of security, drones can be classified under two categories: fully assembled off-the-shelf drones made by drone manufacturers and DIY drones assembled from different components. With the former, the best option for ensuring lawful drone use is to work with the manufacturers to include compulsory security mechanisms into the drones being sold.

From RTÉ Six One News, a report on how drone risk assessment will be carried out at Irish airports

This could include built-in airspace maps which prevent the drone from flying in protected airspace, radio beacons which transmit drone information to nearby authorities during flight and backdoor security access that could allow members of law enforcement to take over and land unlawful drones. Airspace geofencing is already implemented in many of the popular drone brands and safety features like radio beacons are expected to become industry standard very shortly.

DIY drones pose a bigger security concern as a knowledgeable drone operator can assemble a device which lacks the security features discussed above. To deal with this class of drone, active defence systems need to be developed and deployed in high-risk areas.

From RTÉ Radio 1’s Drivetime, Captain Evan Cullen, president of the Irish Air Line Pilots Association, on pilots’ concerns around the use of drones in Irish airspace

Another option for tracking the drone is by listening to its radio transmissions. If a drone is not flying autonomously, it is using a radio link to communicate with its operator on the ground. If this radio signal can be identified then not only can the drone itself be tracked, but so can its operator. The difficulty with this option is that drone radio signals typically use the Wifi spectrum for communication, which means that the radio signal will be hidden among other Wifi device signals. New, more intelligent types of radios are needed to be able to identify the correct signal and track the source.

Other types of tracking are also possible, based on drone emissions such as thermal output or noise. We expect a combination of the above technologies to be used for defending airspace, to maximise effectiveness and reduce the chances of false positives.

Once a drone has been identified, it needs to be stopped. There are numerous options for how to do this, which can be roughly grouped into three categories: stopping the drone operator, interfering with drone communications and physically stopping the drone. To stop the operator, you require law enforcement to quickly locate his or her location. This can be achieved by listening for the remote control signal (see above) or tracking the drone to see where it goes. Police drones equipped with cameras can also be sent out to search for the guilty party.

From RTÉ 1’s Prime Time, Travel Extra editor Eoghan Corry on how well prepared is Irish air space for a drone attack

Interfering with drone communications means jamming radio signals by transmitting a signal on the same frequency with so much power that the target device can’t receive its own signal. This jamming can be applied to the drone-operator radio signal (if the drone isn’t flying autonomously) or the GPS signal which the drone uses to know where it is. The downside of jamming is the collateral damage it causes. Jamming the Wifi frequencies can cause other Wifi devices in the area to be affected, while jamming the GPS signal can be outright dangerous depending on who is using GPS nearby. In the case of Gatwick airport, it is possible that other aircraft flying above could be negatively affected if GPS jamming was used.

Physically stopping the drone is exactly what it sounds like, this can be achieved by shooting the drone with a big gun (for example, ) or cooking it with a high-power laser. A cheaper (and possibly safer) alternative is to use other drones to catch the intruder. These could be drones carrying nets or even cheap drones designed to crash into the target drone at full speed and ram it out of the sky.

READ: how drones will revolutionise farming

Drone technology is developing in leaps and bounds, and anti-drone technology must keep up to ensure public safety. As comical as it may seem today, the next time a drone incursion happens at a major international airport could see a fully-fledged air battle between several remote-controlled aircraft not much bigger than children’s toys.

Boris Galkin is a PhD researcher at CONNECT in Trinity College Dublin

To watch full article with appropriates videos follow this link

https://www.rte.ie/eile/brainstorm/2019/0218/1031223-battle-for-the-skies-how-to-protect-airports-from-drones/