10 predictions for airports of future

We show you our most important and recent visitors news details 10 predictions for airports of future in the following article

Hind Al Soulia – Riyadh – JEDDAH — SITA, the leading IT provider for the air transport industry, on Monday unveiled 10 bold predictions about the technology shaping how passengers will move through the airport of the future, based on unique insights, driving industry forces and emerging technologies.

The airport experience has morphed dramatically in the past 10 years with the introduction of biometric security, mobile check-in, and baggage tracking. And there is much more to come.

The next decade will witness an exponentially accelerated pace of change as digital native passengers and staff usher in transformative technologies, from flying taxis to airports that think for themselves.

Benoit Verbaere, Business Development Director, SITA predicts major change for nearly all aspects of the airport experience.

Verbaere said: “Passenger numbers are set to double in the next twenty years, according to the International Air Transport Association (IATA), but airport expansion won’t keep up. And passengers, quite rightly, want a smooth and easy journey through the airport. The only way we can make sure airports continue to work smoothly is by developing and implementing new technologies that make them more efficient while also enhancing the passenger experience.”

Time travel: a stroll through the airport of the future

1. Security will be integrated into a frictionless journey

Over the next decade, going through security will mean walking along a corridor. No more taking off your coat, shoes, and belt, or putting little bottles into little bags. And no more queues. Passengers and their bags will be recognized automatically as they go through automated checkpoints. Hard checkpoints will be replaced by sensor corridors, making physical document checks obsolete.

2. Passengers will be in control of their digital identity

The adoption of digital self-sovereign identity and persistent travel tokens will put passengers back in control of what aspects of their identity should be revealed, for what purpose, as they travel. In future airports, risk will be constantly assessed by specialist artificial intelligence (AI), using the passenger’s digital identity. The sensitive elements of this data will be used only by governments, which will use automated collaborative systems to approve – or, in some cases, not approve – the various steps of the journey. Airlines will no longer hold the responsibility for processing passenger data for border security purposes.

3. Travel steps will be decentralized

Everything will have tags: people, bags and cargo. And they will be tracked throughout their entire journey, whatever mode of transport they are using. This will mean travel authorization and customs checks can be made in advance of the flight, saving time at the airport. And remote bag drop-off and collection will be offered wherever it is most convenient for the passenger, at train stations for example.

4. The airport will be highly connected

Our new era of connected airports will be driven by increasingly cheap sensors, less dedicated hardware and new data lakes, fed by every device over 5G. The data will be captured through Software Defined Networks, collated and analyzed to make the airport highly efficient and to make it a much better experience for passengers.

5. The airport will think for itself

Artificial Intelligence (AI) algorithms will be key to efficiency, with sophisticated AI becoming the secret sauce for airports. Airports will use Digital Twin technology to bring real-time operations to life for all stakeholders, improving operational efficiency and enhancing the passenger experience. A Digital Twin is an advanced computer simulation that takes data from across the entire airport and airline operations to visualize, simulate and predict what will happen next.

That predictive data will then be used to streamline operational activities, automating them where possible. Automated messages such as: “Two A380s will land at the same time because one is delayed: ensure there are enough people on immigration desks.” or “The feedback from the restrooms on the second level is negative: send the cleaners.” The rapid exchange of information will mean proactive responses and therefore more responsive and accurately planned operations for airlines and airports.

6. Collaboration will be critical

Across every single journey, there are 10 or more different entities that are responsible for making your trip a reality. The only way to collect all the data to make this journey seamless is through close collaboration between everyone working at an airport: the airport itself, airlines, government agencies, ground handlers, restaurants, and shops. We also need collaboration across the entire ecosystem of connected airports.

Throughout this wide network, operational data will be shared using trust frameworks and stakeholders will share single sources of truth for essential operations. This will make airports much more efficient, for example digitizing turnaround management, putting a sharp focus on getting aircraft back in the air as quickly as possible.

Here technologies such as blockchain provide tremendous potential in facilitating the secure exchange of information.

7. The airport will be highly automated

High-speed mobile connectivity at the airport will be central to mission-critical performance. Airports will increasingly run just-in-time operations, with automation and self-service making everything more efficient. And connected, automated and autonomous vehicles and robots are set to become commonplace throughout the airport.

Automation will also enable more efficient sharing and use of assets. A wide range of objects – from baggage or aircraft tugs – will be connected via 5G networks, providing massive amounts of data, offering real-time, predictive and historic views of airport operations.

8. The airport will adapt to passengers’ needs

The fast and frictionless journey to, and through, the airport will make some current revenue streams, for example, parking, weaker or obsolete. Airports will, therefore, need to find new ways to augment the travel experience to replace them. Personalization will be the key, providing passengers with what they want, when they need it at any point throughout their journey from start to finish, not just at the airport.

Examples could include an airport-provided limo service comprising bag check-in at your home, office or hotel, and fast-track approvals and facilitation for regular travelers.

9. Mobility will be a service on demand

Airports will become giant flying ‘park and ride’ centers, providing access to a wide range of transport options. Innovations such as air taxis will be emerging by 2030 to provide much more efficient transport to and from the airport. They may even provide competition on short-haul routes. We will truly have air travel for everyone.

10. There will be an API for everything we do at the airport

Since tomorrow’s travelers will be digital natives, people running airports will need to be digital natives themselves. This technologically-literate environment will result in airport complexity being sliced into a set of data services that can be shared as application programming interfaces (APIs). It will provide an ecosystem that enables collaboration and innovation, which is easier for everyone to use. For example, AI and new syntaxes will enable requests of industry-specific insight in human terms: ‘Is there a pink bag as carry on at gate B34?’ or ‘The line at arrival concourse A is too long, send more taxis’.

Benoit Verbaere, Business Development Director, SITA, commented: “The future of airports lies in connected, highly-intelligent and efficient operations that offer passengers pain-free and frictionless travel and rich, personalized experiences. Today’s blockages and operational silos will dissolve, resulting in data sharing based on digital trust, shared assets and real-time calculations from AI.

“We’re entering a golden silicon-infused era for air travel and we’re excited to be part of the journey. However, it’s essential the industry acknowledges the need for change and collaborates. These technological shifts will happen, and faster than we think.” — SG

These were the details of the news 10 predictions for airports of future for this day. We hope that we have succeeded by giving you the full details and information. To follow all our news, you can subscribe to the alerts system or to one of our different systems to provide you with all that is new.

It is also worth noting that the original news has been published and is available at Saudi Gazette and the editorial team at AlKhaleej Today has confirmed it and it has been modified, and it may have been completely transferred or quoted from it and you can read and follow this news from its main source.

source : https://alkhaleejtoday.co/business/3466/10-predictions-for-airports-of-future.html

Turning Dots and Data into Decisions That Tackle Airport Congestion

Christian Bugislaus Carstens Helping airports globally to unlock capacity, maximise revenue and improve customer experience.

Five quick wins for improving airport queue, occupancy and flow efficiency

Airport queues – nobody likes them, least of all passengers who are running late. Fortunately, with regulators across the world increasingly stipulating the use of queue measurement systems to inform passengers of wait times, the guesswork and stress associated with standing-in-line are diminished. According to SITA’s 2019 IT survey, 77% of airports are now implementing, or have already rolled out, queue measurement and wait-time displays – which is good news for all of us. 

Wait time signage from Newark International Airport

However, communicating wait times to anxious passengers is only the beginning. 3D cameras and people-counting sensors that show dots moving through a line and heat maps where crowds gather are undoubtedly visually helpful. But, it’s what you do with that data, and how you respond to it, that counts.

Veovo 3D sensors

Scores of airports are now mining deeper insights from their queue data to improve operational planning decisions – such as where and how to deploy their staff, and dynamically increase the capacity of their check-in, security and immigration processes. 

If you already measure your processing times, here are some quick tips on how to turn your dots and data into smarter decisions that transform your passenger experience and elevate efficiency. 

#1 Learn from your best crew

Often there can be very different levels of processing efficiency across lanes. It can be challenging to tell why – it could be anything from employees’ positioning, experience or customer service style, to additional screening requirements, staff rotations, or personnel combinations – or any combination of these. 

To understand why one processing line is more efficient than another, use queue analysis together with on-site observations to independently evaluate your checkpoint performance.  Airports that have done so have typically gained a 20-30% efficiency boost by replicating good practices across each line.  

#2 Predict future bottlenecks 

While real-time data is useful, adjusting staffing when a bottleneck is actively building is already too late. Real efficiency boosts occur when airports can accurately forecast passenger arrival, dwell times and movement paths, and create robust resourcing plans around this. Because every change to an existing plan can cause a drop in performance, a good plan will minimise the number of changes required during the day, leading to better performance.

Airports like Birmingham International have found that, by forecasting arrival lead curves on a highly granular basis, they gained 10% performance improvements year on year, despite significant passenger number growth.  

#3 Automate dispatch in peak periods  

A security or immigration hall often deploys a dispatcher during peak times, directing people towards the next available line, or funnelling queues to spread the load.

Consider automating dispatch by creating rules and recommendations based on real-time analysis of queue times and movement data. You can also display directional recommendations ahead of lines, by integrating with operational flight data, to give advice (Go to lane 5, for example) in languages that are most likely to match the profiles of your arriving passengers. 

A mid-sized European airport, with two full-time dispatchers a day, can save €150,000 in the first year alone by automating this process.

#4 Allow for staff self-rostering 

By combining arrival forecasts with staff self-rostering, further efficiency gains can be obtained. This allows teams to evaluate the forecast and adjust their daily roster themselves, to cope with projected peaks. For example, they may choose to shift their break by 10 minutes or rotate at a different frequency during busy periods. 

The grey line below shows the wait time profile of a queue with no predictive recommendations or adjustments to rostering. The blue line shows the improvements experienced when the same staff adjusted their rosters to cope with daily show-up forecasts.

No alt text provided for this image

#5 Take a journey-centric perspective 

A common next step for those already managing queues is to consider airport-wide flow management. This is perhaps more complex than a quick win, but delivers a significant step-up in customer experience and is one of the best ways to maximise airport efficiency and revenue.

Airports are finding that, when they consider processes in isolation, diverting bottlenecks in one area can end up just shifting them further along the line. Instead, by mapping end-to-end movement, and meshing it with road-traffic, flight and concession data, airports can supercharge their insight, to discover meaningful patterns and drive optimal action. 

A European airport recently discovered a few surprises after it embarked on linking passenger flow to flight data. Besides being able to predict when and where lengthy gate dwell times were likely to occur, they identified that passengers on specific carriers typically arrived at the gate 60 minutes before boarding, spending little time in concessions. With these insights, the airport could both extend offerings and services in gate piers to match passenger behaviour, as well as adjust the call to gate times to minimise crowding.

Each bar below shows the total average time spent per area and flight. Green bars = time spent in concession areas. Red/Orange/yellow bars = time spent at the pier/gate. Blue bars = time spent in processing point.

No alt text provided for this image

Queue wait-time displays are only one piece of the puzzle

Communicating wait times is an excellent starting point for improved customer experience – however, they are not the end game. Flow forecasts, together with performance evaluations and automation, not only allow for optimised capacity and reduced bottlenecks at pinch points but, done well, can improve operational, financial and capacity planning decisions.

Once you know, you can act in confidence. For busy airports, that is making all the difference.

source : https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/turning-dots-data-decisions-tackle-airport-congestion-carstens/

China Continues Facial Recognition Adoption With Airport Scanners

By PYMNTS Posted on December 11, 2019

Beijing Daxing International Airport has been incorporating facial recognition software more and more, and it’s being used to do everything from identifying passengers to purchasing items from the duty free store, according to a report by Bloomberg.

China has been upping the ante on places that use the technology, including train stations, customs and of course, the airport. The technology matches a person’s face with their passport, and is meant to speed up the process of traveling through the airport.

Wang Qiang, who is the deputy general manager of planning and design for the starfish-shaped building, said the facility will process over 100 million passengers per year by 2040. The airport is a key piece of Chinese President Xi Jinping’s move into aviation with the goal for China to be the top air travel market in the next decade.

China is farther ahead on the technology than many other countries in the world, and it’s used in fast food restaurants and subway systems in the country. There has been some pushback, however. China Central Television, which is owned by the state, has asked for laws to regulate the technology, and a professor sued a zoo over it as well.

Wang said the technology will help the sometimes tedious affair of moving through airport security, and purchases in shops can be made “with your face.”

Recently, passengers at the airport had a choice of whether to register using their face or documents.

In other China facial recognition news, technology firms in the country are framing facial recognition policies at the United Nations (UN).

Data shows that Chinese tech firms are striving to expand markets for the latest facial recognition technology while advancing a global standard.

Telecommunications equipment maker ZTE, security camera firm Dahua Technology, and the state-owned Chinese telecommunication company China Telecom are among the companies proposing international specifications for universally consistent technology in the UN’s International Telecommunication Union (ITU).

source :https://www.pymnts.com/news/biometrics/2019/china-continues-facial-recognition-adoption-with-airport-scanners/

Airports of the future: SITA’s 10 predictions for the next decade

By Benoit Verbaere, business development director, SITA on December 12, 2019 Airport, Features

Air transport IT provider SITA has unveiled 10 bold predictions about the technology shaping how passengers will move through the airport of the future. Benoit Verbaere, business development director, SITA, predicts major change in almost every aspect of the airport experience.

The airport experience has morphed dramatically in the past 10 years with the introduction of biometric security, mobile check-in, and baggage tracking. And there is much more to come. The next decade will witness an exponentially accelerated pace of change as digital native passengers and staff usher in transformative technologies, from flying taxis to airports that think for themselves.

Passenger numbers are set to double in the next 20 years, according to IATA, but airport expansion won’t keep up. And passengers, quite rightly, want a smooth and easy journey through the airport. The only way we can make sure airports continue to work smoothly is by developing and implementing new technologies that make them more efficient while also enhancing the passenger experience.

Security will be integrated into a frictionless journey
Over the next decade, going through security will mean walking along a corridor. No more taking off your coat, shoes, and belt, or putting little bottles into little bags. And no more queues. Passengers and their bags will be recognized automatically as they go through automated checkpoints. Hard checkpoints will be replaced by sensor corridors, making physical document checks obsolete.

Passengers will be in control of their digital identity
The adoption of digital self-sovereign identity and persistent travel tokens will put passengers back in control of what aspects of their identity should be revealed, for what purpose, as they travel. In future airports, risk will be constantly assessed by specialist artificial intelligence (AI), using the passenger’s digital identity. The sensitive elements of this data will be used only by governments, which will use automated collaborative systems to approve – or, in some cases, not approve – the various steps of the journey. Airlines will no longer hold the responsibility for processing passenger data for border security purposes.

Travel steps will be decentralized
Everything will have tags: people, bags and cargo. And they will be tracked throughout their entire journey, whatever mode of transport they are using. This will mean travel authorization and customs checks can be made in advance of the flight, saving time at the airport. And remote bag drop-off and collection will be offered wherever it is most convenient for the passenger, at train stations for example.

The airport will be highly connected
Our new era of connected airports will be driven by increasingly cheap sensors, less dedicated hardware and new data lakes, fed by every device over 5G. The data will be captured through Software Defined Networks, collated and analyzed to make the airport highly efficient and to make it a much better experience for passengers.

The airport will think for itself
Artificial Intelligence (AI) algorithms will be key to efficiency, with sophisticated AI becoming the secret sauce for airports. Airports will use Digital Twin technology to bring real-time operations to life for all stakeholders, improving operational efficiency and enhancing the passenger experience. A Digital Twin is an advanced computer simulation that takes data from across the entire airport and airline operations to visualize, simulate and predict what will happen next.

That predictive data will then be used to streamline operational activities, automating them where possible. Automated messages such as: “Two A380s will land at the same time because one is delayed: ensure there are enough people on immigration desks” or “The feedback from the restrooms on the second level is negative: send the cleaners”. The rapid exchange of information will mean proactive responses and therefore more responsive and accurately planned operations for airlines and airports.

Collaboration will be critical
Across every single journey, there are 10 or more different entities that are responsible for making the trip a reality. The only way to collect all the data to make this journey seamless is through close collaboration between everyone working at an airport: the airport itself, airlines, government agencies, ground handlers, restaurants, and shops. We also need collaboration across the entire ecosystem of connected airports.

Throughout this wide network, operational data will be shared using trust frameworks and stakeholders will share single sources of truth for essential operations. This will make airports much more efficient, for example digitizing turnaround management, putting a sharp focus on getting aircraft back in the air as quickly as possible.

Here technologies such as blockchain provide tremendous potential in facilitating the secure exchange of information.

The airport will be highly automated
High-speed mobile connectivity at the airport will be central to mission-critical performance. Airports will increasingly run just-in-time operations, with automation and self-service making everything more efficient. And connected, automated and autonomous vehicles and robots are set to become commonplace throughout the airport.

Automation will also enable more efficient sharing and use of assets. A wide range of objects – from baggage or aircraft tugs – will be connected via 5G networks, providing massive amounts of data, offering real-time, predictive and historic views of airport operations.

The airport will adapt to passengers’ needs
The fast and frictionless journey to, and through, the airport will make some current revenue streams, for example, parking, weaker or obsolete. Airports will, therefore, need to find new ways to augment the travel experience to replace them. Personalization will be the key, providing passengers with what they want, when they need it at any point throughout their journey from start to finish, not just at the airport.

Examples could include an airport-provided limo service comprising bag check-in at your home, office or hotel, and fast-track approvals and facilitation for regular travelers.

Mobility will be a service on demand
Airports will become giant flying park and ride centers, providing access to a wide range of transport options. Innovations such as air taxis will be emerging by 2030 to provide much more efficient transport to and from the airport. They may even provide competition on short-haul routes. We will truly have air travel for everyone.

There will be an API for everything we do at the airport
Since tomorrow’s travelers will be digital natives, people running airports will need to be digital natives themselves. This technologically-literate environment will result in airport complexity being sliced into a set of data services that can be shared as application programming interfaces (APIs). It will provide an ecosystem that enables collaboration and innovation, which is easier for everyone to use. For example, AI and new syntaxes will enable requests of industry-specific insight in human terms: ‘Is there a pink bag as carry on at gate B34?’ or ‘The line at arrival concourse A is too long, send more taxis’.

The future of airports lies in connected, highly-intelligent and efficient operations that offer passengers pain-free and frictionless travel and rich, personalized experiences. Today’s blockages and operational silos will dissolve, resulting in data sharing based on digital trust, shared assets and real-time calculations from AI.

We’re entering a golden silicon-infused era for air travel and we’re excited to be part of the journey. However, it’s essential the industry acknowledges the need for change and collaborates. These technological shifts will happen, and faster than we think.

source : https://www.passengerterminaltoday.com/features/airports-of-the-future-sitas-10-predictions-for-the-next-decade.html

TSA Wants to Shoot Down Drones Near Airports

The TSA wants to give air marshals the power to use Defense Department equipment to shoot down drones near airports, two congressmen said, seeking to tackle drones that can disrupt airport operations.    According to a news report, in a letter to the Department of Homeland Security that summarizes the plan, Reps. Sam Graves (Mo.) and Mike Rogers (Ala.) on the House Transportation and Homeland Security committees “said the idea goes far beyond what they envisioned when they gave the federal government new powers to counter drones last year.”   The report notes that Graves and Rogers said only the Federal Aviation Administration has the expertise to manage the nation’s skies: “Nobody wants drones to cause disruptions at our airports, but to hastily hand over authority to shoot down drones to an agency that doesn’t have the critical knowledge or experience of how our airspace system functions is irresponsible and dangerous.”   In December 2018, London’s Gatwick Airport was closed Thursday during one of the busiest times of year after drones were spotted over the runway. According to The Associated Press, the prospect of a collision between an “industrial”-grade drone and an airliner led authorities to stop all flights in and out of the airport. Police said that the intrusion was a deliberate attempt to disrupt operations at the airport during a peak period, but that the disruption was not terror-related.  

source : https://www.securitymagazine.com/articles/91399-tsa-wants-to-shoot-down-drones-near-airports

Dubai Airports to remove all single-use plastics by early 2020

Dubai International Airport and Al Maktoum International Airport will remove all uses of single-use plastics following the original pledge in June 2019.

Dubai airports to remove all single-use plastics by early 2020

Following the original pledge by Dubai Airports in June 2019, the self-imposed deadline for Dubai International Airport (DXB) and Al Maktoum International Airport (DWC) to ban all single-use plastics is drawing near. 

In a bid to manage the two airports’ environmental impact, Dubai Airports has been working in close partnership with over 250 of its concession and hospitality partners in order to completely rid the airports of single-use plastics by early 2020.

Executive Vice President of Commercial at Dubai Airports, Eugene Barry, said: “This pledge is another step on a long journey to becoming a more environmentally responsible airport. Along with our partners, including global brands such as McDonalds, Costa Coffee and Starbucks, we are committed to not only removing single-use plastics but, in their place, providing appropriate and importantly sustainable alternatives.”

Each year, 90 million passengers pass through DXB and DWC and use tens of thousands of single-use plastic items, such as straws, water bottles and coffee lids daily. As a result of this huge number, the new initiative has presented serious challenges to those trying to put it in place.

Barry continued: “Among the challenges faced, the biggest is sourcing alternatives for plastic bottles, one of the most frequently used and discarded pieces of single-use plastics. As we work to reduce and ultimately eliminate plastics from our airports, we are increasing our recycling facilities in the customer spaces and a new partnership that will allow us to properly dispose of thousands of tonnes of single-use plastic, each year.”

The project, which will be implemented in phases, will see plastic cutlery, drinking straws, take-away food packaging and polythene bags removed from cafés, restaurants and shops within the airports by 1 January 2020. The following 12 months will see additional products replaced in both customer spaces and non-public spaces within the airports.

source : https://www.internationalairportreview.com/news/108639/dubai-airports-to-remove-all-single-use-plastics-by-early-2020/

AIRPORTS OF THE FUTURE: 10 PREDICTIONS FOR THE NEXT DECADE

Posted by: Team | NewsPatrolling

National, 11 December 2019: SITA, the leading IT provider for the air transport industry, today unveils 10 bold predictions about the technology shaping how passengers will move through the airport of the future, based on unique insights, driving industry forces and emerging technologies.

The airport experience has morphed dramatically in the past 10 years with the introduction of biometric security, mobile check-in, and baggage tracking. And there is much more to come.

The next decade will witness an exponentially accelerated pace of change as digital native passengers and staff usher in transformative technologies, from flying taxis to airports that think for themselves. Benoit Verbaere, Business Development Director, SITA predicts major change for nearly all aspects of the airport experience.

Verbaere said: “Passenger numbers are set to double in the next twenty years, according to the International Air Transport Association (IATA), but airport expansion won’t keep up. And passengers, quite rightly, want a smooth and easy journey through the airport. The only way we can make sure airports continue to work smoothly is by developing and implementing new technologies that make them more efficient while also enhancing the passenger experience.”

Time travel: a stroll through the airport of the future

1.Security will be integrated into a frictionless journey

Over the next decade, going through security will mean walking along a corridor. No more taking off your coat, shoes, and belt, or putting little bottles into little bags. And no more queues. Passengers and their bags will be recognized automatically as they go through automated checkpoints. Hard checkpoints will be replaced by sensor corridors, making physical document checks obsolete. 

2.Passengers will be in control of their digital identity

The adoption of digital self-sovereign identity and persistent travel tokens will put passengers back in control of what aspects of their identity should be revealed, for what purpose, as they travel. In future airports, risk will be constantly assessed by specialist artificial intelligence (AI), using the passenger’s digital identity. The sensitive elements of this data will be used only by governments, which will use automated collaborative systems to approve – or, in some cases, not approve – the various steps of the journey. Airlines will no longer hold the responsibility for processing passenger data for border security purposes. 

3.Travel steps will be decentralized

Everything will have tags: people, bags and cargo. And they will be tracked throughout their entire journey, whatever mode of transport they are using. This will mean travel authorization and customs checks can be made in advance of the flight, saving time at the airport. And remote bag drop-off and collection will be offered wherever it is most convenient for the passenger, at train stations for example. 

4.The airport will be highly connected

Our new era of connected airports will be driven by increasingly cheap sensors, less dedicated hardware and new data lakes, fed by every device over 5G. The data will be captured through Software Defined Networks, collated and analyzed to make the airport highly efficient and to make it a much better experience for passengers.

5.The airport will think for itself

Artificial Intelligence (AI) algorithms will be key to efficiency, with sophisticated AI becoming the secret sauce for airports. Airports will use Digital Twin technology to bring real-time operations to life for all stakeholders, improving operational efficiency and enhancing the passenger experience. A Digital Twin is an advanced computer simulation that takes data from across the entire airport and airline operations to visualize, simulate and predict what will happen next.

That predictive data will then be used to streamline operational activities, automating them where possible. Automated messages such as: “Two A380s will land at the same time because one is delayed: ensure there are enough people on immigration desks.” or “The feedback from the restrooms on the second level is negative: send the cleaners.” The rapid exchange of information will mean proactive responses and therefore more responsive and accurately planned operations for airlines and airports.

6.Collaboration will be critical

Across every single journey, there are 10 or more different entities that are responsible for making your trip a reality. The only way to collect all the data to make this journey seamless is through close collaboration between everyone working at an airport: the airport itself, airlines, government agencies, ground handlers, restaurants, and shops. We also need collaboration across the entire ecosystem of connected airports.

Throughout this wide network, operational data will be shared using trust frameworks and stakeholders will share single sources of truth for essential operations. This will make airports much more efficient, for example digitizing turnaround management, putting a sharp focus on getting aircraft back in the air as quickly as possible.

Here technologies such as blockchain provide tremendous potential in facilitating the secure exchange of information.

7.The airport will be highly automated

High-speed mobile connectivity at the airport will be central to mission-critical performance. Airports will increasingly run just-in-time operations, with automation and self-service making everything more efficient. And connected, automated and autonomous vehicles and robots are set to become commonplace throughout the airport.

Automation will also enable more efficient sharing and use of assets. A wide range of objects – from baggage or aircraft tugs – will be connected via 5G networks, providing massive amounts of data, offering real-time, predictive and historic views of airport operations

8.The airport will adapt to passengers’ needs

The fast and frictionless journey to, and through, the airport will make some current revenue streams, for example, parking, weaker or obsolete. Airports will, therefore, need to find new ways to augment the travel experience to replace them. Personalization will be the key, providing passengers with what they want, when they need it at any point throughout their journey from start to finish, not just at the airport. 

Examples could include an airport-provided limo service comprising bag check-in at your home, office or hotel, and fast-track approvals and facilitation for regular travelers.

9.Mobility will be a service on demand

Airports will become giant flying ‘park and ride’ centers, providing access to a wide range of transport options. Innovations such as air taxis will be emerging by 2030 to provide much more efficient transport to and from the airport. They may even provide competition on short-haul routes. We will truly have air travel for everyone.

10.There will be an API for everything we do at the airport

Since tomorrow’s travelers will be digital natives, people running airports will need to be digital natives themselves. This technologically-literate environment will result in airport complexity being sliced into a set of data services that can be shared as application programming interfaces (APIs). It will provide an ecosystem that enables collaboration and innovation, which is easier for everyone to use. For example, AI and new syntaxes will enable requests of industry-specific insight in human terms: ‘Is there a pink bag as carry on at gate B34?’ or ‘The line at arrival concourse A is too long, send more taxis’.

Benoit Verbaere, Business Development Director, SITA, commented: “The future of airports lies in connected, highly-intelligent and efficient operations that offer passengers pain-free and frictionless travel and rich, personalized experiences. Today’s blockages and operational silos will dissolve, resulting in data sharing based on digital trust, shared assets and real-time calculations from AI.

“We’re entering a golden silicon-infused era for air travel and we’re excited to be part of the journey. However, it’s essential the industry acknowledges the need for change and collaborates. These technological shifts will happen, and faster than we think.”

source : http://www.newspatrolling.com/airports-of-the-future-10-predictions-for-the-next-decade/

Asia’s airports stretch their retail and leisure wings

Singapore’s Changi and South Korea’s Incheon look to lift nonaviation revenueYUICHI SHIGA, Nikkei staff writer December 10, 2019 06:47 JST

The operator of Singapore’ Changi Airport earns 60% of its revenue from retail operations and rent.   © Getty Images

TOKYO — Hosting tens of thousands of visitors per day, international airports offer a unique setting for retail and entertainment. Asian airports are eager to take advantage as an expanding middle class and the growth of budget carriers add fuel to fire, with the facilities morphing from mere waystations to shopping and leisure destinations in their own right.

In Singapore, Changi Airport’s new Jewel commercial complex is a 1.7 billion Singapore dollar ($1.24 billion), 135,700-sq.-meter facility that offers much more than a typical duty-free area. It features, among other things, the world’s tallest indoor waterfall and the country’s largest maze.

The International Air Transport Association, a trade group, forecasts global air passengers to double to 8.2 billion by 2037. Asia is expected to lead the growth, encouraging airport operators to devote more effort to ancillary businesses.

Asian airports are trying to become more like department stores, focusing on maximizing sales and rental income. Changi Airport Group is leading the way. In the fiscal year ended March, it earned 60% of its revenue from rent and retail operations.

Jewel has 280 tenants and attracts about 300,000 visitors a day. The airport operator hopes keeping the shops and attractions open late will pull in transit passengers. “In Singapore, Changi Airport is a tourist attraction in itself, and Jewel has enhanced that reputation and appeal,” Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong said at the official opening on Oct. 18.

South Korea’s Incheon International Airport — one of the world’s most popular, thanks in part to its huge duty-free shopping area and a movie theater — announced its Vision 2030 project in September. By 2024, the airport plans to add runways and passenger terminals, and it hopes to use artificial intelligence and other advanced technologies to become more efficient.

According to local media reports, Incheon aims to increase its annual passenger volume to more than 100 million per year and double its sales to 5 trillion won ($4.19 billion) by 2030. Incheon wants to become the world’s No. 1 facility by airport throughput unit, an index that measures an airport’s ability to handle both passengers and freight. Encouraging those passengers that traffic will mean taking steps such as bringing in more popular restaurants and boutiques.

In China, Beijing Daxing International Airport opened in September and started handling international flights in late October. The 80 billion yuan ($11.3 billion) facility has set an annual passenger target of 45 million by 2021. Eventually it wants to raise that number to 100 million. While Beijing Capital International Airport is mostly used by domestic passengers, Daxing Airport plans to focus on international flights.

Hong Kong International Airport plans to open SkyCity, a large complex nearby, in 2021. The airport hopes to become a commercial center, as yearly passenger numbers are expected to hit 100 million by 2030.

Japanese airports are also increasing their nonaviation revenues. Sales from tenants at Japan’s Narita Airport hit a record 143.2 billion yen ($1.32 billion) in the fiscal year ended in March. That was a 70% jump from five years earlier and comparable to sales at Isetan Mitsukoshi Holdings‘ flagship Mitsukoshi Nihombashi department store, one of the oldest in Japan. The airport operator’s retail unit now accounts for 42% of total revenue. That is comparable to its aviation business.

Next spring Haneda Airport will open a complex that is directly connected to the international terminal. It will feature a hotel, restaurants, stores and a spa.

Becoming a hub airport in fast-growing Asia can deliver a big economic shot in the arm by developing a neighborhood’s infrastructure and attracting international events. Haneda Airport estimates that an increase in departure and arrival slots next year will lift its earnings by 650 billion yen a year.

But there will be occasional turbulence. Political tensions or epidemics could scare off travelers. “Stable profits at nonaviation units will lead to sustainable growth,” said analyst Kotaro Toriumi. It offers operators a way to smooth out the bumps.

source ;https://asia.nikkei.com/Business/Business-trends/Asia-s-airports-stretch-their-retail-and-leisure-wings