Dublin Airport focused on technological innovation and stakeholder collaboration to enhance passenger experience

Dublin Airport is constantly seeking new ways of working, and embracing and implementing new technology to improve customers’ journey and experience through the airport.

Vincent Harrison, Managing Director, Dublin Airport, explains to FTE’s Ross Falconer €2 million has been invested in 62 new self-service kiosks to streamline the check-in and bag drop process in both Terminal 1 and Terminal 2.

In conversation with Future Travel Experience, Vincent Harrison, Managing Director, Dublin Airport, emphasises the importance of stakeholder collaboration. Indeed, the airport is a supporting partner of the co-located Future Travel Experience Europe and Future Travel Experience Ancillary events, taking place in Dublin, 26-27 June. “I think the fact that they are airports and airlines events, with prominent airline participation from Ryanair and others, will make the debate very useful, particularly in a collaborative sense,” says Harrison. “There’s a lot of players in the market trying to position what they’re doing, or their own niche, and I don’t get the sense that there’s enough joined up thinking, whether that’s between airports and airlines, or between the various providers, so I think that will be an interesting topic for discussion.”

From a customer experience perspective, Dublin Airport is working to catch more in-depth data and utilise that to build a better service. For example, over 30 ‘Happy or Not’ machines have been installed along key areas of the passenger journey in Terminals 1 and 2.

Digital innovation is also at the heart of this strategy. Dublin was among the first airports in Europe to offer free, unlimited WiFi, and this is accessed via a simple one-click process.

“We also have an award-winning mobile app with real-time information on queue times at security and US CBP and ‘my flight’ push notifications that keep passengers fully informed of any last minute changes to their flight,” says Harrison.

Meanwhile, as part of efforts to enhance the growing transfer business, Dublin has worked closely with Google to provide a free virtual digital assistant guide – DUB HUB – for connecting travellers. This provides passengers with a digital map showing their current location, the boarding gate number of their connecting flight, directions to the gate and the approximate time it will take to walk there. “DUB HUB uses real time geo-location tools to give users a simple graphic interface with clear walking directions to the gate,” Harrison explains. Indeed, this has been extended to offer targeted food & beverage and retail offers to transfer passengers.

More and more of the airport’s frontline staff are using mobile technology to help with easy and quick access to information to help passengers on their journey through the airport. “We have streamlined products and services on our website so passengers can select accessory travel services such as car parking, fast track through security, Platinum Services and executive lounges,” Harrison notes. “We have developed online shopping services so passengers can pre-order before they fly and collect when they are departing. Also, passengers can shop and leave items for collection on the return journey.”

Smoothing the airport journey and speeding up processing times

The drive for innovation is truly creating a seamless airport experience. Dublin Airport is one of only two in Europe, along with Shannon, to offer US Preclearance, which allows passengers to be treated as domestic travellers upon arrival in the US.

“US Preclearance has seen the introduction of 16 digital pods that capture the passengers’ image, and fingerprints [an ESTA requirement] as part of the pre-preparation stage,” Harrison comments. “We have collaborated closely with US CBP to facilitate new Automated Passport Control kiosks to smooth the journey and speed up processing times in that area. We have also worked closely with the Irish Naturalisation Immigration Services, INIS, which operates immigration at the airport, to provide automated passport reading machines in passport control.”

Last year, Dublin Airport opened a first-of-its-kind passenger lounge after US Preclearance in Terminal 2. Business class passengers flying with Aer Lingus, Delta Air Lines, United Airlines and American Airlines have complimentary access to the lounge, which is called 51st&Green, and other travellers can pre-pay online for entry. It is another differentiator for Dublin Airport.

Last year, Dublin Airport opened a first-of-its-kind passenger lounge after US Preclearance in Terminal 2. Business class passengers flying with Aer Lingus, Delta Air Lines, United Airlines and American Airlines have complimentary access to the lounge, which is called 51st&Green, and other travellers can pre-pay online for entry.

Also last year, €2 million was invested in 62 new self-service kiosks to streamline the check-in and bag drop process in both Terminal 1 and Terminal 2.

FTE Europe and FTE Ancillary attendees will be able to experience these innovations for themselves on a dedicated airport tour.

“If you’re interested in emerging technologies, FTE Europe and FTE Ancillary are the ideal platforms. I’m certainly looking forward to what the other players will be highlighting as new technologies or new ways of looking at the business,” Harrison concludes.

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Best Futuristic Smart Suitcases You Must Try

Best Futuristic Smart Suitcases You Must Try

1. Bluesmart – http://amzn.to/2sJEG4t (Amazon USA) | http://amzn.to/2rDkRwH (Amazon India)
Bluesmart is a high-quality carry-on suitcase that you can control from your phone, like a boss. From the app you can lock and unlock it, weigh it, track its location, be notified if you are leaving it behind and find out more about your travel habits.

2. Travelmate – https://igg.me/at/bAzz2f7Dhqk/x
Travelmate is the first true robot companion and fully autonomous suitcase. It works seamlessly in crowds and doesn’t require any extra peripherals. Travelmate can move vertically and horizontally when autonomous. You can take it with you when you’re going to the airport, commuting to work or just walking outside.

3. Cowarobot R1 – https://igg.me/at/cowarobot/x
Cowarobot R1 is a fully autonomous smart suitcase, that follows its user while avoiding obstacles in its path.

4. Marlon – https://igg.me/at/marlon/x
Spacious and lightweight, Marlon touts only functional features: one click compression, oversized wheels, & USB charging.

5. Floatti – https://igg.me/at/floatti/x
Floatti features a helpful docking strap and integrated hooks to fasten your handbag, backpack or briefcase securely on top – leaving your other hand free for tickets, passport or other travel necessities.

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KLM takes next strategic social media step with flight info on Twitter and WeChat

Customers can contact KLM’s social media service agents 24/7 directly via Twitter and WeChat.

 

As of today, KLM Royal Dutch Airlines offers her customers around the world booking confirmation, check-in notification, boarding pass and flight status updates in 10 languages on Twitter and WeChat. This makes information easy to find in a single place, so it is available at the airport, en route or at home. Customers can also contact KLM’s social media service agents 24/7 directly via Twitter and WeChat.

The new service will be available to all KLM customers who book tickets or check in via KLM.com and opt-in to receive information via Twitter or WeChat. The roll out starts today and the service will be more widely available in the coming weeks. In 2016, KLM was the first airline worldwide to offer flight documents and information via Messenger. Now, it is first again on Twitter and first airline outside China offering flight info on WeChat.

“After Messenger, offering KLM flight info on Twitter and WeChat is a perfect addition to KLM’s social media strategy. We believe that we should be where our customers are. KLM now takes her social media service to the next level, offering customers the choice of their own favourite channel. And by doing so, we continue to be an aviation pioneer.”
Pieter Elbers, KLM President & CEO

KLM on Twitter and WeChat

KLM has over 2.2 million fans on Twitter and receives more than 25,000 mentions on a weekly basis. In September 2014, KLM started her WeChat account, offering passengers 24/7 service, brand content and commercial offers. WeChat is the no. 1 social media platform in Mainland China with 938 million monthly active users. KLM has over 120,000 fans and receives over 6000 questions a week, which shows that Chinese customers appreciate this platform to communicate with KLM.

KLM on Messenger

Last year, KLM introduced the KLM flight info service via Messenger, which proved to be a success. More than 1.4 million customers received their KLM flight documents and updates via Messenger, 10% of all online KLM bookings are confirmed via this channel and 15% of all online KLM boarding passes are sent via Messenger.

About KLM and Social Media

Since 2009 KLM gained a reputation as an initiator and pioneer in the area of social media services and campaigns in the social landscape. In April 2017, KLM had over 25 million fans and followers on various social media platforms. Through these channels, KLM receives over 100,000 mentions every week, 15,000 of which are questions or remarks. These are personally replied to by our 250 service agents, forming the world’s largest dedicated social media team. On Facebook, Messenger, Twitter, LinkedIn, WeChat and KakaoTalk KLM offers her customers a 24/7 one-stop-shop in 9 different languages: Dutch, English, German, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Chinese, Japanese and Korean. During office hours KLM also services in Italian.

source : https://tinyurl.com/ybu2adaj

 

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Facial recognition technology will soon make airport check-ins a breeze

Delta Airlines plans to install bag-check kiosks —

including one that has facial-recognition technology — allowing passengers to skip the line for an agent.

Delta Airlines plans to install bag-check kiosks — including one that has facial-recognition technology — allowing passengers to skip the line for an agent.

Credit: Courtesy of Delta Airlines

 

With stories of unhappy air travelers blanketing social media in recent months, one major airline is trying something new.

Delta Air Lines plans to install special bag-check kiosks at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport, giving customers the chance to skip waiting in line for an agent. One of the new kiosks will include facial-recognition technology, using a camera to confirm passengers’ faces against their passport photos.

Delta says the kiosks will save passengers time while freeing up agents to help out in other ways. In a statement to Engadget about the new kiosks, a Delta spokesperson confirmed that traveler images won’t be stored after use and that the airline will comply with all privacy laws.

“I think everybody wants to save time in the travel process,” says Jennifer Lynch, a senior staff attorney at the Electronic Frontier Foundation. “It appears to be a system that just takes a picture of you one time and compares that picture against your passport … so that’s a pretty good use of face recognition as a verification process.”

But for Lynch, the technology raises concerns about passenger privacy in the future.

“We’ve seen a lot of private companies that are interested in face recognition recently — both for verification purposes, like Delta, and for real-time identification, like retail stores and sports stadiums,” she says. And if these private companies ever decide to change their terms of service and begin saving images, she warns, the technology could yield valuable information.

“The data that accompanies these face scans — like where you were on a given date and time — could be aggregated and sold to banks and insurance companies and used to determine your creditworthiness or your insurance risk,” she says. “And it could also be shared with law enforcement.”

Recently, Customs and Border Protection said it wants to expand its use of facial recognition at airports — including on US citizens. “That’s from security to airport lounges to the boarding gates,” Lynch says.

When that happens, Customs and Border Protection will likely need help gathering all that traveler info, Lynch says. “It’s going to need to rely on private partners like Delta and the airlines to get this kind of data.”

And, “one thing we do know is that data is never collected in a vacuum,” she says. “Customs and Border Protection will likely share this kind of data — the face recognition data, and where you were on a given date and time — with the FBI and other law enforcement.”

“That could subject innocent people to unnecessary surveillance and potentially even criminal suspicion.”

This article is based on an interview that aired on PRI’s Science Friday.

source : https://tinyurl.com/y77zowcr

 

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