Toronto’s Pearson airport to use Vancouver company’s AI-powered technology to detect weapons

Hexwave scanners use panels that transmit and receive low-powered radar waves that generate images. The images are analyzed via artificial intelligence, which alert security when a threat is detected. Michelle McQuigge, The Canadian Press Updated: October 2, 2019

Liberty Defense Technologies executives Aman Bhardwaj, president and chief operating office, and Bill Riker, CEO. Liberty Defense is a startup company developing high-tech body scanners for security at facilities such as sports stadiums, airports and public facilities. PNG

TORONTO — Canada’s busiest airport will soon be using artificial intelligence-powered technology to detect weapons.

The operator of Toronto’s Pearson International Airport says it has agreed to test the new system developed at an Ivy League American university and marketed by a B.C. company.

Vancouver-based Liberty Defense Holdings Ltd. says the technology, known as Hexwave, can detect both metallic and non-metallic weapons ranging from guns and knives to explosives.

It operates by capturing radar images, then using artificial intelligence to analyze those images for signs of a weapon concealed in bags or under clothing.

Liberty says the technology is not able to recognize facial features and therefore does not pose a privacy risk, a position experts in the field view with some skepticism.

The Greater Toronto Airports Authority, which operates Pearson, says it will start deploying the technology in the spring of 2020 in a bid to boost security.

“They were trying something that could give us a more definitive look at weapons and plastic explosives that may be coming into airports,” Dwayne MacIntosh, director of corporate safety and security for the authority, said in a telephone interview. “When I saw this opportunity, I felt that we had to be part of it.”

An artistic rendering showing how Liberty Defense Technologies might deploy the high-tech scanners it is developing at a sports stadium. The scanners, which use millimetre-wave radar, AI and3D computer rendering, scan for potential weapons, explosive devices or other threats on people passing through the devices. Liberty Defense has also partnered with Toronto’s Pearson airport to use its scanners to test for weapons starting in spring 2020. PNG

MacIntosh said exact plans for the pilot project are still underway, but said Hexwave units will be deployed just outside airport terminals in order to pick up on potential threats before they get inside.

One of the system’s benefits, he said, is that it can be integrated with other airport security features and trigger responses based on what it picks up. Detection of certain weapons, for instance, could automatically trigger doors to lock or sound specific alarms.

The Hexwave technology traces its origins back to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where the antenna array and transceiver were developed.

Liberty devised its weapons-detection product after acquiring the licensing rights from MIT, according to CEO Bill Riker.

The system is still being evaluated in the company’s lab, but the next phase of testing will take place in public settings beginning next spring. Pearson airport is not the only location — the Metro Toronto Convention Centre has also signed on as a test site.

Riker said Hexwave works by capturing a 3D radar image that is then subjected to scrutiny from a program that has been trained to recognize a wide variety of weapons.

Riker said Hexwave does not feature cameras and does not have the capacity to capture images of people’s faces.

“Radar … essentially is emitting this form of energy, it’s reflecting off a person and it’s identifying any items on a person’s body that don’t belong on a body,” he said.

Hexwave is designed for use in crowded environments, Riker said, noting the process of capturing and analyzing a radar image takes less than a quarter of a second.

source: https://vancouversun.com/business/local-business/torontos-pearson-airport-to-use-vancouver-companys-ai-powered-technology-to-detect-weapons

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